Sorry Day

Guest post by JooR

Today is SORRY DAY . . . and I am personally not sorry for anything, I haven’t done anything to warrant issuing an apology.  I am however sorry for the pain felt by many Indigenous peoples over the time since European settlement . . . I am sorry that cultures tens of thousands of years old were shattered and much destroyed.

I am sorry that the traditional lands of many a people were, in reality, stolen. I am sorry that babies and children were ripped from their families.  I am sorry for the sickness and diseases the Europeans brought to you.  I am sorry for the Alcohol and the Tobacco.  I am sorry for the lack of understanding of Indigenous cultures (which I can be guilty of BUT PLEASE TEACH ME).

I am sorry that your women suffered abuses, I am sorry for the tragedies of Myall Creek and other instances, the tainted flour the poisoned water and I am sorry that people thought these things were fine. I am sorry for the humiliation and lack of respect given to those who fought alongside white troops in our armed services, when they returned home and were not given the same salutations.

I am sorry that there are those in our society that cannot even attempt to understand or who have unrealistic expectations of how you should live, think or feel.  I am sorry for your people’s suffering.  I am sorry that people shrug their shoulders and do not care. I am sorry that it took so damn long for you to be recognised as citizens in the land your ancestors had lived upon for tens of thousands of years.

I AM SORRY.

Meanwhile, in South Australia, Aboriginal people will be formally recognised in the state’s Constitution in a radical move planned by the State Government.

Premier Jay Weatherill will announce the move today to mark Reconciliation Week 2012. Aboriginal leaders have welcomed the announcement.

“For too long, Aboriginal people have been treated as second-class citizens,” Mr Weatherill said yesterday.

“This will elevate them to their rightful place as first Australians and (it) pays them proper respect.”

2:3 Normal or de jure version of flag, or obve...

The Australian Aboriginal Flag (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

197 comments on “Sorry Day

  1. Shades of Donny Dunstan, but it is very good news. Let’s hope it doesn’t just stop there, it has to be followed through with tangible improvements in all areas for the First Australians.

    But it’s a start.

  2. Much thanks to JooR for her topic. Some things might seem to be just token gestures, but important for people who are continuously denigrated. Imagine being part of a nation of people where people in a majority white society nod wisely and say Yes the intervention was needed because of the amount of drugs and alcohol/underage sex/domestic violence. It’s not a good feeling.

    One of my Dad’s sayings was don’t say Sorry, do Sorry. But saying it is at least a start and a confirmation of intent.

  3. I think there are many Aussie out there … that do not consider what SORRY DAY IS ALL ABOUT…

    It is certain.. I have never , knowingly, done anything personally that warrants an apology……….from ME FOR MY ACTIONS… However… we can STILL be sorry.. we can still feel sorry .. and as you said Min.. we can DO SORRY …

    Too many people think that they are being ASKED to TAKE PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY for the actions of others… where as what it is about .. is understanding how much the Indigenous have been impacted upon and to try and understand things from their point of view… try and feel a portion of the pain they have felt ,, and feel sorry that they have suffered that pain,

    I am STILL not personally responsible for past wrong doings.. BUT I will be responsible if I don’t acknowledge them.. If I start thinking JOHN HOWARD history…

    Like the recent Atrocity in Syria .. I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE.. but I am sorry people, including children died as they did.

  4. I remember last year there being much more media on Sorry Day, and a fair bit of it positive.

    How come it’s so mum this year, or have I missed something?

  5. Mobius, perhaps because the Media are too preoccupied in trying to assist in bringing the Government down instead of reporting on Other Important Issues .. …

    ooops did I type that out aloud ??

  6. Yes they are preoccupied with putting in their puppet, but it is an important day that deserves better from the mouth and eye pieces of the nation.

  7. I actually am sorry. I’m sorry that I used to think that Aboriginal jokes about lubras were funny, that when people spoke about dirty Abos that I remained silent. I’m sorry that it’s taken me until now to realize that via my previous silence and failure to take action, that I was once part of the problem. I hope and pray that I have learnt, and hope that in the future that I can be in some small way part of the solution.

  8. JooR, ME it is interesting how quite the msm has been, I’v got that dreaded man-flu and have been watching tele most of today, but I didnt hear about Sorry Day til I popped into the Cafe.
    Min, your Dad sounds like he was a wise man… ‘do sorry’, I’v taken that on board.

    When Kev said sorry I chucked a sickie that day so I could watch, my GF at that time thought I was a bit odd doing that, she didnt understand why I had tears running down my face when it was finaly said… I tried to explain to her how it was more than saying Sorry and recognising past wrongs…. to me it was like Australia had come of age, like we had arrived, like we were all one people….. recognising our histories both good and bad somehow, to me at least,meant there was a future for this country that was worth something….. and I wish I was a bit more literate like some of you lot so I could explain it better but hopefully you sorta get what I mean.

  9. LOVO… you write with passion… and that explains exactly what you mean…. 🙂

    what you wrote there .. was written extremely well

  10. I am sorry too. Not because I abused anyone. I did not. My crime and that of my family was to patronize and believing the Aboriginals were lacking in brains. At the same time, my family did stand up for them. I did not realise this until I grew up.

    I am angry that even where one had contact, we did not realise the harm being done,

    For that I feel personal sorrow because they were my actions.

    There is another type of sorrow. that does not arise from my actions but for the suffering the people endured. I am not saying sorry here, because I did something. My sorrow here is for those who suffered. It was not necessary. It was criminal.

    It would be criminal today, not to recognized that abused.

    What happened in the past cannot be changed. That does not meant that the abuse should not be acknowledged. it has to be, so we can all move on.

  11. I am sorry that I was not aware that this is Sorry Day. I am angry with myself too. Angry as well that there is not one mention of Sorry Day on the ABC news site, not even when Aboriginal disadvantage is mentioned in the EMA debate. Not even when Australian story is about AIME a mentoring program for young aboriginal people. How did that happen? I’m not a great radio listener or TV viewer, except for the national news and 7.30. So perhaps I missed something, like Mobius Ecko??

  12. Patriciawa .. the thoughts I wrote down are what I carry all the time so I don’t focus on the date and I had forgotten the date for Sorry Day .. and it was only through the social media that the date was made aware to me…………

    Sadly .. it seems to have skipped the Media’s attention

  13. Nup, NOT Sorry at all
    the reality of history is that human beings can only “own” land or resources for as long as they can exclude others from it. Frankly all of this well organised hand wringing, sack cloth and ashes does is to promote a “poor bugga me “mindset when looking towards the future and taking up the opportunities that our current modern society offers all Australians would be far more beneficial to indigenous people.

  14. Iain, apologies. There is a possibility that it was trapped in Spam, however it seems that your comments are getting through..so please feel free to give it another try. Otherwise we’ll have to wait for technical assistance to arrive.

  15. OK MIN I’ll try again. 🙂

    Essentially I think that the whole notion of ” Sorry day ” does our indigenous Australians no favours at all because it just entrenches a backward looking “Poor bugga me ” victim mentality rather than encouraging those at the bottom to work towards building a better future by taking up the opportunities that contemporary Aussie culture offers.
    So I’m not “sorry ” at all

  16. Iain, I can appreciate that point of view however there are many people who believe that Sorry represents acknowledgement of past mistakes. Only once we have Sorry can we move forward.

  17. Patricia, it seems not. Like many others I was not even aware that it was Sorry Day, until I read JooR’s article.

  18. So lets see. All those other events around the world where there was a reconciliation and sorry event, including the Germans saying sorry for the holocaust, the Japanese finally apologising for their war atrocities and even the Roman Catholic Church apologising are all a waste of time and we should always look forward and forget the past no matter what actions were undertaken.

    Funny how conservatives only ever want to look forward when it suits their very narrow point of view and rusted on mired in the past ideology, yet always want to look back if they believe it can bring up dirt against what they laughingly call socialists or the left, or if they think they can get mileage out of it in patting themselves on the back to prove their born to rule mentality is justified.

  19. Möbius Ecko

    I think that you miss my point here, I have no objection to acts of contrition but when such things become calcified by investing them in a particular day it becomes rather self defeating because it prevents a people or group from moving on. So how long do you think that our sympathies should be invoked before enough “sorrys” have been offered?

  20. Mobius, plus Tony Abbott gave the distinct impression (at the time of the Tent Embassy) that he believed that Aborigines should just get over it. Additionally, we still have the likes of Andrew Bolt racially vilifying Aborigines of mixed heritage and receiving public approval for this attitude.

  21. Iain, many people would consider that Sorry needs to continue until at least a modest amount of equality has been achieved for the Aboriginal people. Perhaps an idea is for Australia to have this day incorporated into a general day of recognition much like the United States with its Native American Day – people would then be free to express this day in what ever form it may take, whether it be Sorry or a recognition of Aboriginal culture.

  22. Iain, one would never be in error of thinking you would.

    The only person in the world that matters to you, is you. You are too arrogant, selfish and self centre ti be swayed by misfortunes of others.

    I feel sad for those who need to reject history, so they feel OK.

    I am a great believer in seeing history as it is. I feel no need to put blinkers on.

    We have much to be proud of. Much success in spite of some of the bad things that occur.

    The Aboriginals are not asking for pity.

    They are asking for acknowledgement, that many are to ashamed or ignorant to give.

  23. Catching up,

    Your sentiments mirror my own. Perhaps sorry is an unfortunate word, Acknowledgement Day would be better.

  24. “Sorry or a recognition of Aboriginal culture”

    Maybe when it becomes Recognition Day, we will have arrived. Then the likes of Iain will no longer have reason to gripe. I believe hell will freeze over first.

  25. Cu, that seems to be the best option. There are certain people who will never be satisfied, especially when they think that someone is undeserving. Why worry about whether someone says Sorry or not, other than that the believe that the other doesn’t deserve a Sorry..not worthy, not good enough. A 5 minute Welcome to Country is perceived as a waste of time….

  26. Cu, I would suspect the middle one Respect lies at the crux of it all. With Respect one also gains recognition and thus reconciliation.

  27. I was sorry, when we had the Ruddster deliver his international, intregalactic commiseration speech of sorry to anyone who might have been upset or hurt by wrongdoings in the past…

    Part of moving on from the past involves accepting that apology and then moving on…

    I didn’t expect that we’d be expected to say sorry every year FOR THE REST OF ETERNITY….

    FOR EVER!

    Fck that.

    That’s not an expression of moving on in good faith, that’s just a symbol of refusing to let go of the past and bearing a grudge…

    Sorry, but I’m not sorry anymore…

  28. i Like Recognition Day …..

    It takes away the possibility that people THINK that they are being made to BE responsible for the past… BUT makes them responsible for recognising the wrong doings…
    Those that forget History are doomed to repeat it…. It’s pretty clear that Reb and Iain DON’T GET what Sorry day is actually about…..

    We commemorate ANZAC DAY every year … Consider that Sorry DAY or RECOGNITION DAY ( if you have an issue with the word SORRY ) is just as important… to a portion of our population………

    I mean we *celebrate* a Day when the British DUMPED a bunch of Convicts on these shores…. and that day in itself I recognise that some see it as INVASION DAY ..
    So if you don’t like SORRY DAY .. how about you sacrifice our Insensitive AUSTRALIA DAY on the 26th January…

    How about we push for a NATIONAL HOLIDAY that actually can be appreciated BY all .. rather than a reminder of a day in history that is More connected to SORRY DAY than Reb or Iain might care to admit….

    but …. maybe… that’s a consideration for another blog… another day ..

  29. I feel sorry for *holes such as Iain and co., after all they dont realise how f* up their mentality is….. pert, pretensious, priggish, peacocks all…… So Sorry Iain for how you think during your one life on earth, Sorry you dont know how dumb you really are, Sorry you have a dog eat dog mentality,Sorry you put money before your own fellow Australians and Sorry you havnt quite made it down outta the trees yet.

  30. JooR and

    Those that forget History are doomed to repeat it…. It’s pretty clear that Reb and Iain DON’T GET what Sorry day is actually about…..

    We commemorate ANZAC DAY every year … Consider that Sorry DAY or RECOGNITION DAY ( if you have an issue with the word SORRY ) is just as important… to a portion of our population………

    Precisely. We should immediately ban ANZAC Day because who wants to get maudlin about a long forgotten war. However, celebrating the Queen’s birthday which isn’t her birthday anyway is fine and dandy.

    Just a thought put perhaps the word sorry is more easily translated into Aboriginal languages, with recognition being a bit obscure..but I will have to defer to Migs on that one.

  31. “pert, pretensious, priggish, peacocks all”.

    ??

    Many of the people I know are “less sorry than me”.

    I thought Rudd’s apology was a good thing, but my peers were of the view that they weren’t personally responsible for the wrongdoings of a generation ago, so why should they be made to feel complicit and apologetic over something that they had absolutely nothing to do with..

    It’s a reasonable point of view.

    My counter to that perspective, was that if Rudd’s apology helped everyone move on from the past in the spirit of reconcilliation then it’s a worthwhile thing to do.

    That’s what I thought it was all about…

    I didn’t expect that we’d have to do it every fkn year for the rest of our lives and our children’s children’s children’s lives.

    That’s just BS!

  32. Oh good, re “I didn’t expect that we’d have to do it every fkn year for the rest of our lives and our children’s children’s children’s lives.” ..we can now immediately cancel all public holidays, Christmas, Easter etc etc.

    And while we’re at it, let’s cancel birthdays as well..because they also happen every year..well at least until one parts this earthly realm. Surely one doesn’t have to celebrate one’s birthday every fkn year…. 😀

  33. REB …. so we should simply forget the Millions that died in the Holocaust too ? Forget that it happened ?
    Forget the Fallen along the Burma Railway…Forget the fact that We were treated like cannon Fodder by Churchill ?

    I don’t think the Indigenous people want you grovelling on your knees , flaying yourself with the cat-o-nine tails.. JUST TO REMEMBER the things that happened

  34. There is NOTHING COUNTER PRODUCTIVE to simply be asked to remember..

    SO you remember…. what of your children and grandchildren?? DO YOU REALLY WANT THEM TO BE IGNORANT OF HISTORY ?

    hey let’s just not LEARN any history EVER

  35. Reb, so you don’t like Sorry Day. That’s cool.

    I don’t celebrate Easter but I have no issue with others doing so. It’s their choice, as it is mine.

  36. JooR and

    REB …. so we should simply forget the Millions that died in the Holocaust too ? Forget that it happened ?
    Forget the Fallen along the Burma Railway…Forget the fact that We were treated like cannon Fodder by Churchill ?

    JooR, and for quite a while Australia did forget. I remember a time when there was a TV show about Milne Bay. I suddenly thought, I think that my dad knows something about this. Who had even heard of Milne Bay until a decade or so ago. Who knew how close we came to a land invasion by the Japanese.

    We are abysmally ignorant of our own recent history. We are abysmally ignorant about the stolen generations.

  37. YOU don’t even eat EASTER EGGS ??? 😉 ( actually neither did we this year)

    I think it’s one thing not partaking in something … and another one bagging it out.

  38. Many of the people I know are “less sorry than me”.

    Reb, I never took you as a person who mixed with rednecks. 😉

  39. And look in regards to remembering those that fell along the Burma railway… to ME it ISN’T about forever despising the Japanese for what happened… JUST REMEMBERING..

  40. So Do I Miglo 🙂

    well rather MY car is a ford… but I tend to drive my daughter’s holden lately LOL

    see we’re a Multimotor family 😀

  41. “so we should simply forget the Millions that died in the Holocaust too ? Forget that it happened ?
    Forget the Fallen along the Burma Railway…Forget the fact that We were treated like cannon Fodder by Churchill ?

    So, so far we’ve got four sorry days and counting…. 🙄

  42. Migs and

    Many of the people I know are “less sorry than me”.

    Reb, I never took you as a person who mixed with rednecks. 😉

    Sorry must come on a sliding scale of sorry, sorrier and sorriest..I’m in the latter category. 😦

  43. Reb and

    So, so far we’ve got four sorry days and counting…. 🙄

    That’s fine..Easter eggs and hot X buns are at Coles and Woolies by the end of the Xmas sales.

  44. “I don’t celebrate Easter but I have no issue with others doing so. It’s their choice, as it is mine.”

    Very true. I’m not religious either so Easter means nothing to me other than a couple of days off work…

    And just like Christians don’t demand or expect me to celebrate/commemorate Easter, I don’t think that the “sorry-dayers” should demand/expect everyone to be sympathetic to their point of view and jump on the bandwagon of apologising every year for the rest of eternity….

    If you want to garner public support, the very least you could do is turn it into a day off work… 😉

  45. “I never took you as a person who mixed with rednecks”

    I try not to make a habit out of it… But these were genuinely nice people who just couldn’t see why they ought to be apologising for something that their generation wasn’t responsible for, which I think is a perfectly legitimate point of view to hold.

  46. “Sorry must come on a sliding scale of sorry, sorrier and sorriest..I’m in the latter category.”

    I was genuinely sorry on the inagural sorry day, but I don’t have any more genuine sorry left to give for the sequels.

    In fact, I think I’d just be faking it, which is probably worse…

    (Mind you, if you could arrange the whiole public holiday thing, I might be able to garner a few confected tears)

  47. I think radical Christians are more demanding than Aborigines.

    Ever had Jehovas Witnesses or Mormans knock on your door trying to push something down your throat?

    I’ve never had an Aborigine knock on my door demanding an apology.

  48. Reb and

    But these were genuinely nice people who just couldn’t see why they ought to be apologising for something that their generation wasn’t responsible for

    Well maybe these genuinely nice people should take a moment or several to acquaint themselves with the facts…ignorance is some excuse, but not much of one.

  49. “I’ve never had an Aborigine knock on my door demanding an apology.”

    I’ve had them approach me in the street demanding $2, which is quite a different thing from asking for you to sign over your soul, which is something I wouldn’t really consider even if there was a public holiday on offer.

  50. “Well maybe these genuinely nice people should take a moment or several to acquaint themselves with the facts…ignorance is some excuse, but not much of one.

    They are familiar with the facts and the history Min, they just don’t feel that they personally should be made to feel compelled to apologise for something that their generation had nothing to do with.

    Any more than I should feel compelled to apologise for the Opium wars…

    It’s a legitimate point of view irrespective of how it doesn’t gel with how you think they should feel….

  51. Migs and

    I’ve never had an Aborigine knock on my door demanding an apology.

    Actually yes. Son’s brother in law left a large red emperor in the back of the ute and son left it there forgetting to put it in the fridge. You want to see angry indigenous people..try doing that one.

  52. I’ve spoken to the boss and the idea of a public holiday is something she is happy to endorse, however, Tony Abbott is expected to oppose it.

    But not to be outgunned she whispered that she’d consider camouflaging it under a different name, such as Godfearers Day. Tones will love it.

  53. I don’t think I APOLOGISED IN what I wrote Reb…..

    did you actually READ the piece here ????

    I am Sorry that a people have suffered as much as they did.. ? aren’t YOU ?

  54. Reb and the Opium Wars..it would be good if the truth be told from the Chinese perspective rather than garnishing facts from Charlton Heston and 55 Days at Peking.

  55. are you sorry they suffered 😕 Do you rejoice in their suffering ?

    or… do you not care that there was suffering ..

    and as for the Opium Wars… forcing the opening up of China and all that Jazz…
    The Japanese saw what happened and willingly westernised..

    BUT now.. in this point of history .. where the US is in as much Debt to China as it is .. and where we are as dependent on their trade with us as never before…

    it’s interesting where events of the past have brought us.. Don’t you think ?

  56. I like JooR’s idea that this can also be a day of education (about our history). Gawd knows we don’t learn it anywhere else.

  57. Min.. I think the west is somewhat paying for it’s arrogant of forcing the Chinese to trade as it did… Proof if ever there was that Karma’s Bitch…

    we (n.b the west ,and no that is NOT taking personal responsibility ) once had China by the short and curlies… kinda seems cosmically fair they now have many of us by the same

  58. I ADORE HISTORY … it is the ever continuing tapestry of where we came from and where we’re going ..

  59. Actually the Opium Wars was one of my things. Interesting stuff..how the Americans twisted the whole story around. The Chinese wanted to stop the opium trade. Opium had previously been exclusively for the wealthy, the Americans started to supply it to the masses. The Americans started to pay their Chinese workers with opium rather than money. Interesting story…and one which has repeated itself.

  60. AND remember also How HONG KONG came to be *British* and why it was handed back .. so many people would have NO IDEA …

  61. Did you know that the Aborigines of Lake Mungo (40,000 – 15,000 BC) were not of robust build like the modern day or other Aboriginal groups, but were gracile like Chinese people?

  62. That’s excellent news Migs….. 🙂

    At the risk of stretching a friendship, I suppose a long weekend would be out of the question?

    We could just put “The John Howard Ten Year Prime Ministerial-ship Appreciation and Poignant Reflection Anniversary Weekend” on the application form….

    That ought to get past the tories…

  63. Migs, indeed gracile but wasn’t that the majority of Aborigines with the exception of a few stockier types. Long slim legs and that’s a certainty.

  64. Iain and reb, I see where you’re coming from. Just saying sorry doesn’t cut the mustard; it has to be accompanied by action and tangible improvement in the lot of Aboriginal people in general.

    reb and Many of the people I know are “less sorry than me”. Snap! I live in the country and the overwhelming feeling is “so what?” and “they brought it on themselves.” How is beyond me.

    But every time they start whining about asylum seekers on boats, I say, “Now you know how the blackfellas felt.” The normal response is a puzzled look, but I hope if I say it often enough, the penny might drop.

    A good start is in the class room. Kids have to know that there was a major civilisation in this country before we invaded; that the original inhabitants practised agriculture and animal husbandry, but not as we would recognise it.

    I finally tracked down the book by Bill Gamage that eg was talking about last year. It is very enlightening.

    When the first Europeans arrived in NSW, they were amazed at how park-like the country was, but never imagined that its appearance wasn’t natural, but a deliberate form of animal husbandry practised by the native population.

    Even more interesting is that it was practised Australia wide. It wasn’t until Aboriginal people were driven off the land that thick scrubland took hold until we spread out and started clearing the land.

    We should never forget that an entire population was almost wiped out by foreign diseases against which they had no natural resistance and a deliberate attempt to wipe them from the face of the earth, because we think we’re superior to them.

    What it means to me is that we’ve deprived ourselves of their accumulated knowledge. And the geniuses in the Arts, Sciences and Mathematics to name just three disciplines. David Uniapon was the catalyst for that thought. How many David Uniapons have we destroyed and how much poorer are we for that?

    We should never forget that because others do things differently from us doesn’t mean that they are candidates for destruction. If we subscribe to those views, we shouldn’t be surprised if other cultures think it gives them permission to do the same to us.

    It may surprise everyone to know that the Japanese were well aware of the way we treated our Aboriginal population……..

  65. Reb and

    “the Aborigines of Lake Mungo ..”

    Which proves the point about how little Australians know about our own culture..or aren’t Aborigines included? History only happened when the white fella discovered us.

  66. Yes, the archaeological record reveals that the skeletal characteristics are similar to today’s Asian people. They were culturally the same as all other Aboriginal groups though.

    Some people speculate that today’s Aborigine is a mixture of the two distinct groups: the graciles and the extreme robusts.

  67. Jane – I agree with just about everything you’ve said there…

    There’s no denying the atrocities which took place in the past….

    But compelling current and future generations to continue to apologise for what’s been the fault and responsibility of past generations just strikes me as a bit weird…

  68. I think I have an unfair advantage in the knowledge stakes with two university degrees in Aboriginal issues. That is why I put up my Indigenous threads – to educate.

    Maybe I should think of another one.

  69. But compelling current and future generations to continue to apologise

    We aren’t compelling them, rebster. Nobody is compelled to, which is JooR’s original point.

  70. But every time they start whining about asylum seekers on boats, I say, “Now you know how the blackfellas felt.” 😆 😆 😆

  71. Reb and

    But compelling current and future generations to continue to apologise..

    But reb, it’s only been a couple of years. I doubt that Sorry Day provided any inconvenience to yourself, perhaps an extra car or 2 on the way to the club.

  72. “We aren’t compelling them, rebster. Nobody is compelled to, which is JooR’s original point.”

    Yes, agreed and understood…. But Min seemed to take umbrage at people who didn’t feel compelled to climb aboard the annual “sorry” bandwagon, labelling them “ignorant.”

  73. reb
    May 29, 2012 @ 1:46 pm

    Jane – I agree with just about everything you’ve said there…

    There’s no denying the atrocities which took place in the past….

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    AND REB… that is ALL THAT SORRY DAY IS ABOUT … don’t you get that ??

    It’s like when you say that you’re Sorry about the Death in a Family a friend may have experienced… YOU’RE NOT APOLOGISING FOR THAT DEATH .. YOU’RE SAYING THAT YOU’RE SORRY FOR THEIR LOSS…

  74. “I doubt that Sorry Day provided any inconvenience to yourself”

    Gawd Min, how many times do I have to say it… I felt strongly that Rudd’s sorry day speech was absolutely the right thing to do (despite most of my peers feeling otherwise)…

    I just don’t think it’s such a great idea to keep dragging it up every year…

    An apology is generally a ‘one-off’ gesture that is offered and accepted and then everyone moves on…

    I just don’t feel any sense of “sorry” anymore and to pretend to do so which just be insincere…

    I think the idea of “remembrance day” as someone suggested earlier is a better idea…

    Especially if it involves a long weekend.

  75. reb, I agree with Migs that there’s no compulsion, but more of a guilt trip. However, that only leads to resentment, which I think is your point.

    What we do have to do is encourage a change in attitudes and that can only happen with education and contact.

    When my kids were in primary school, one of the school camps was Camp Coorong where they were shown the fish traps the people used, how they made cooking vessels and wove baskets to carry water and food stuffs.

    And they were taught about Aboriginal politics: negotiating water rights and use, hunting, territorial boundaries, passports and passport control, trade agreements, technology and ceremonial exchanges, rules of war. The list goes on.

    It all sounds very modern, doesn’t it? Of course it is, they’re modern homo sapiens like the rest of us.

    Son #1 came home full of awe and respect.

  76. Reb and

    Gawd Min, how many times do I have to say it… I felt strongly that Rudd’s sorry day speech was absolutely the right thing to do (despite most of my peers feeling otherwise)…

    Sounds fine by me. I know that you’ve been a strong supporter of a number of issues over the years, including Aboriginal ones.

    So, we have one Sorry Day and for then after Auntie Mabel picks up her straw broom and sweeps it and the carpet. It was nice when it happened, but it’s now all best forgotten. Hey, sounds like my ex 😀

    And I just don’t feel any sense of “sorry” anymore....better not run that one by the bf or you will be in the sleepout on some very chilly Hobart mornings.

  77. i’m shouting because you seem deaf to what is actually being said..

    actually I know the common use of caps ,. but I use them for emphasis .. but don’t worry that’s passed posts now…. you can forget them ..

    😉

  78. Reb How come JooR keeps shouting? Anger management issues..?? JooR realised that you are a male..not further comment required…

  79. Perhaps all Reb needs is the first paragraph of JooR’s piece?

    Today is SORRY DAY . . . and I am personally not sorry for anything, I haven’t done anything to warrant issuing an apology. I am however sorry for the pain felt by many Indigenous peoples over the time since European settlement . . . I am sorry that cultures tens of thousands of years old were shattered and much destroyed.

  80. That sounds like a terrific experience for the kids Jane…

    A much more valuable and effective learning experience, than just saying “hey you lot ought to feel very sorry”…

    Which just sounds all a bit too catholic for my liking.

  81. My granddaughters are 1/4 blood salt water people. In celebration of Sorry Day here is granny’s story. L* is full blood TSI. She came to Australia as a small girl during WW2. Australian troops took the young women and the young girls to Cairns knowing what fate awaited them at the hands of the Japanese. Many families lost track of each other, not knowing that they had died or who had been repat’d.

    The sense of family is very strong, perhaps knowing what they have lost and so each person is treasured. This is a story of celebration for those valiant Australian troops to cared for and protected the TSIslanders during those days. In all of my family I perceive no resentment, but a cheeky sense of humour..but that’s just they way they are.

  82. Reb…. strangely enough the day is called SORRY DAY … not Apology Day ..

    but … I guess that it suits you to keep going on about Apologising …

    because it allows you to keep your back up

  83. I’m pleased that all have refrained from personal attacks. I was afraid the thread might have gone that way.

    In my view, everybody’s opinions are respected and they are welcome to voice them here.

    Gosh, even some of mine have merit. 😯

  84. While NOT responsible for your Man-flu Miglo.. I am indeed sorry you are feeling unwell

    😉

  85. “I hope everybody is SORRY for me”

    If you can throw in a public holiday, I’ll write a letter of apology in blood….!

  86. “I guess that it suits you to keep going on about Apologising … “

    Is there any point I’ve made you haven’t missed………? :ROLL:

  87. well Given Reb you are commenting on the thread about the Piece I wrote… It is I that keep asking what on earth it is that you missed in it…

    My guess is.. that you didn’t actually read much passed the Title Of *Sorry Day*…

    because you will see that I didn’t apologise and nor do I ask that others do.. but you have gone on like the proverbial cracked gramophone about apologies ????

  88. My feelings. If people want a Sorry Day, then who am I to say that they shouldn’t feel this way. If people want Easter and Christmas or Passover who am I to say Yer wrong.

    I cannot think of a reason to say No, you can’t do it. We have been speculating about maybe a better way, that Sorry might wear out it’s welcome. I agree. However is Australia the only continent on the face of the planet which does not have one day set aside for it’s original inhabitants…perhaps we might consider having one.

  89. Reb and

    Is there any point I’ve made you haven’t missed………? :ROLL:

    Yes reb..it’s lower case. 😉

  90. “perhaps we might consider having one”

    Agreed Min, I think it’s just the terminology of “sorry” day that doesn’t sit comfortably with me. It kind of perpetrates the whole “victim” and perpetrator mentality and really just locks those status points thereby preventing anyone from really moving on…

    I agree with the suggestions of others that perhaps “remembrance” day or “recognition” day would be more sort of fitting – and perhaps even a more comfortable term for those who I know feel that they have nothing personally to be sorry for…

  91. I’m sorry Migs banished me and my man flu…….
    Sorry Day for me was Our country taking responsibility for its history, as has been said,…. Recognize, Respect, Reconcile…… Reb, I dont think its an absolute individual thing (tho it can be) I think its more a ‘collective’ Sorry from the Commonwealth of Australia, recognize that we as a people have blood on our hands in a historical sense, respecting ourselves as a people by taking responsibility for our collective past(s) as a Commonwealth, reconcile that that is our past and being able to learn from it so we can move forward, together, one people. Our past shapes our future, we should have Sorry Days so we know how ‘not to be’, same as how we remember the Anzac’s as a way of ‘how to be’…. lest we forget ……

  92. reb @2.25pm, well the church does specialise in guilt. But as Migs has suggested, education is the way to go. Guilt free and far more interesting.

    and @3.06pm, you’re quite right the “victim” “perpetrator” terms are counter productive and just lock in that mental image to the exclusion of progress.

    Like you, I really like Min’s idea of a Remembrance Day or something similar.

  93. I like the flag and we should extend that to ‘something similar’, a recognition of their survival on this large island for over 60,000 years.

    We need a positive spin on the Dreamtime.

  94. With the Permission of the Indigenous People and Bugger the Bogans.. I would LOVE too see their flag as our national flag…

  95. I think we should have the Port Adelaide Football Club banner as our national flag.

    It’s one we could all be proud of.

  96. a recognition of their survival on this large island for over 60,000 years.

    That, el gordo, was music to my ears, by the way. At last someone else is acknowledging that Indigenous occupation in this country goes way past the 40,000 years that is forever spruiked.

    The oldest archaeological remains have been dated at 63,000 years BP (before the present). And in Queensland of all places.

  97. “And in Queensland of all places”

    Does this mean our idigenous brothers and sisters invented polyester….??!!

  98. I know a little off track for this thread but a quote from the stuff I’m reading on the myth of the wealthy creating jobs,

    :”If it was true that lower taxes for the rich & more wealth for the wealthy led to job creation, today we’d be drowning in jobs”

    All the Robber Barons would do is demand that Aboriginals be hired at a lower rate with less conditions and the government subsidise them for hiring Aboriginals. They would then find ways to automate the processes whilst also moving the jobs offshore, or bringing offshore workers onshore at cheaper rates, then say if the Aboriginals want to work then they have to do it at a lower rate than the foreign workers.

  99. Re Mobius, reb, migs..it just has to be..apologies for the selective quoting…

    invented polyester..safari suits…and for all this we’re sorry. 😉

  100. So, going on the above quotes, we have all come to the conclusion that sorry day is a waste of time and a fraud.

    We wonder why the Aboriginals do not have respect for us, our values and way of life.

    As for values, we have none, well none that do not put us front and centre.

    I do not believe the person put this post up, to be ridiculed.

    I am sorry to see this outcome. It is what it is all about. Respect for others and their views.

    I am sorry indeed to the depths that our once wonderful society has sunk.

    I am afraid, a Abbott government will be what we all deserve.

  101. I don’t think you can draw that conclusion from the majority of posts CU? Most were in full support of JooR’s article. Most of the disagreement was about semantics and different people’s interpretation and context of the word “sorry” but the underlying sentiment is one of acknowledgement of what sorry day was (and is) about…

  102. Bacchus, some, maybe most but not all.

    Why do we need the negatives in this one.

    It is not about semantics. The use of the word was fully explained in the post.

    What do we get. Welfare dependence etc.

  103. ‘All the Robber Barons would do is demand that Aboriginals be hired at a lower rate with less conditions and the government subsidise them for hiring Aboriginals.’

    I’m assuming you have hard evidence to support this ludicrous claim. The reality is that the robber barons can’t get enough workers and the local people (used to the harsh conditions of the outback) will get the jobs at the appropriate rate.

    Before Whitlam (BW) the indigenous population were underpaid, but there won’t be any of that on our watch.

  104. JooR @4.13pm, I really like that.

    I think we should have the Port Adelaide Football Club banner as our national flag.

    It’s one we could all be proud of.

    Hear! Hear! Migs. A worthy thought. But failing that, the Aboriginal flag is a wonderful idea. As eg suggests, it represents their 60,000 year history and the distinction of the longest continuous culture in the world.

    There is so much to be proud of.

  105. I really think those that were negative… didn’t actually read what it was I wrote..

    and they were exactly the people I was aiming for ….( or at ???)

    In my opening paragraph :

    ~~Today is SORRY DAY . . . and I am personally not sorry for anything, I haven’t done anything to warrant issuing an apology. I am however sorry for the pain felt by many Indigenous peoples over the time since European settlement . . . I am sorry that cultures tens of thousands of years old were shattered and much destroyed.~~

    ~I acknowledged that some people are not Guilty of ANYTHING and have nothing to be apologising for …………………………………………… BUT…. there is plenty to be SORRY FOR…. and to just purely acknowledge …….

  106. AND PEOPLE ( yes REB I AM SHOUTING AGAIN .) … Thank-you for reading this piece
    xoxoxoxox

  107. Damnation, it seems that I’ve missed all of the action..what’s this all about, kissing reb. I am not certain where I stand, lie or fall on that particular issue…

  108. El gordo and I’m assuming you have hard evidence to support this ludicrous claim. The reality is that the robber barons can’t get enough workers and the local people (used to the harsh conditions of the outback) will get the jobs at the appropriate rate. Oh you poor naive little girl…if the robber barons were providing jobs for Indigenous people then why do they have the highest unemployment rate in Australia. Shucks..must be all their own fault because they’re just a bunch of lazy Abo lazyabouts. [Due respects, my daughter in law being a half full blood].

    Yes indeed Aboriginal are given a few jobs by Twiggy and their ilk..they can clean toilets, change the bed linen in the dongers for the while workers, and occasionally get to be trained as a driver to ferry Massa Forrest around.

  109. ‘they can clean toilets, change the bed linen in the dongers for the while workers’

    That’s what I do for a living at half the award wage and I’m ‘white’, fair dinkum, but being self employed I don’t care.

    Any work is better than welfare.

  110. Oh really el gordo, your country, your people and you get to change the massa’s bed linen while the white fellas rip tens of millions of dollars out of your country.

  111. Any work is better than welfare~~~~

    INDEED…. if the pay and conditions ARE INDEED the same as what they would be for a *white person* ……

  112. Any work is better than welfare.

    Owning (or running) a country motel is a vastly different proposition, no?

  113. That’s what I do for a living at half the award wage and I’m ‘white’, fair dinkum, but being self employed I don’t care.

    Is that a salary you draw?

  114. Bacchus, it is making beds. I still think it is better if one owns the beds they make.

    How has sorry day, evolved into blaming the victim.

    I believed that sorry day should be about what happened to the Aboriginals, and how that affects them today.

    Of course whites can never lower the, and could have been in the wrong. No we cannot have that.

  115. el gordo, I would rather drive one of them big trucks, or better maintaining them, getting some real money.

  116. I may be wrong CU, but I’ve deduced from watching el gordo’s posts, that she either owns or runs a country motel west of Sydney – this she wants to compare with the extraordinary “opportunities” the likes of Twiggy offer to our indigenous friends in the west 🙄

  117. What I am getting is that traditional owners should be content with changing the bed linen and should forget about things such as fully recognised qualifications such as a Trades Certificate. 1,002 1/2 jobs created. 1,000 people changing the bed linen and washing dishes. 2 and 1/2 people trained to a trades qualified standard.

  118. Jokes aside, I think it’s quite admirable that el gordo went into business for herself. I don’t think I could ever have the courage to do it.

  119. Miglo, we are not having a go at that. At least I am not. What I am getting to.

    It is arrogance and a put down of a person, black or white, to say any job is better than welfare.

  120. Agree 100% Migs, but to compare that with employing a “servant class” in WA mines is disingenuous. Let the traditional owners own and run the accommodation near the mine sites and you may have a comparison.

    Better still, train the local population to take on the highly skilled positions which have been need for the last 10 years, and will be needed for many years into the future, rather than only offering relatively “menial” jobs – then I’ll start to respect the “mining billionaires”…

  121. Yuk. How can anybody kiss Reb

    I dunno, a peck on the cheek……

    Jane, I like the idea of Gavin Wanganeen Day myself.

    Migs, you have just said the magic words. How did you know the fabulous Wangas is my favourite player? Although Senior Burger is up there, too. 😆 😆 😆

    Actually, eg, I don’t mind making beds etc, although I’m not keen on cleaning up vomit and that sort of stuff. That’s what you have kids for. lol

    I do draw the line at dealing with the public, though.

  122. (Possibly worst of all would be traditional or ultimate owners forming a Rain(bow)maker Corporation and JVing, or subcontracting, or leasing the actual mining out, like Clive and Gina; because, then they’d be directly competing with the Twiggy and etc. Nay, better to have the navvies divided by territories and conquered by compulsory negotiation over scraps, forever incapacitated in securing relevant title, rather than have them contemplating being bosses (of) themselves and merely employing the expertises of not-rent-seeker middle-skimmers in the grand round of holey ground to value-added product.)

  123. ‘Jokes aside, I think it’s quite admirable that el gordo went into business for herself.’

    Thanx Migs, you’re the only gentleman here.

    In country towns there are those with good paying jobs, about a quarter of the population, the rest are either on welfare or running very small business….on third world wages.

    The Koories come in from the outer districts on Thursday to get their money.

  124. ‘THE NSW government will give unprecedented authority to 15 new executive principals in schools servicing difficult indigenous communities in an attempt to tackle a long-standing culture of low expectations and disastrous educational outcomes.’

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/more-power-and-pay-for-principals-in-effort-to-rescue-indigenous-learning-20120529-1zhgy.html#ixzz1wIYfgWJ8

    It’s the beginning of an effort to break the welfare cycle and (as they are just as bright as the rest of us) get good jobs and keep out of the prison system.

    It’s going to be a long haul, but it’s heartening to know that a Coalition government is actually trying to do something real.

  125. El gordo, “low expectations” is precisely it and not just by the students and parents but also by some teachers. One program which proved successful was modelled on an idea emanating from the American ghettos where children were provided with breakfast. It seems that children don’t mind staying at school, the problem is encouraging them to arrive in the first place. Unfortunately this program (I believe) closed some years ago due to lack of government funding.

    Another very useful thing is to ensure that children in Aboriginal communities have top class equipment, rather than at present where there are often not even enough desks to sit on. I remember a teacher being queried about this and his response was the desks weren’t needed as most days many children didn’t turn up to school anyway…thus we get back to the theme of low expectations.

  126. it’s heartening to know that a Coalition government is actually trying to do something real.

    hmmm – there’s that “I’m of the Labor left” BS coming through again 🙄

    Are you perhaps talking about something similar to this fellow? Note the year (2003), the state, (Qld) and the government at the time (Labor). It’s taken a long time for a Coalition government to catch up 😉

    http://www.whatworks.edu.au/3_3_14.htm

  127. ‘hmmm – there’s that “I’m of the Labor left” BS coming through again’

    As I pointed out earlier, only barrackers are mindless, pathetic people, overwhelmed by group think.

  128. On the flag, how about that Aboriginal flag and the TSI flag replaceing the Union Jack on the existing flag?

  129. el gordo, as you are so knowledgeable on the subject, can you answer for me me:-

    When did welfare dependency begin?

    Why did they become dependent on welfare?

    What did they do before they became dependent on welfare?

    What stood in their way of moving themselves off welfare?

    Why do you think so many continue to have to rely on welfare?

    Do you accept that our society might carry some of the blame for the plight they find themselves in?

    I suspect you believe they are completely responsible for the situation they are in. I suspect you believe they choose the lifestyle..

  130. el gordo, I only listen to see what a big fools the Opposition make of themselves asking silly questions.

    I also have no problem with the bill, I suspect others here are in the same mind.

    There are more important things occurring at this time.

  131. We are now moving onto other concerns. The Oppositions concern for the parents missing out on the school handout. Why did they miss out under the old system through the taxation system.

    First reply, the usual answer is usually wrong.

  132. Too busy. Maybe take time to look around you and ponder on the fact that a things do move on, and one should catch up.

    One cannot do that while they are fully occupied telling every one else what they should be thinking.

    el gordo, you do have the time. You choose not to.

  133. Former High Court judge Michael Kirby says Australia should have acted more boldly decades ago to address the disadvantages faced by indigenous communities.

    Justice Kirby says in the years since the 1967 referendum, which ended constitutional discrimination of Aborigines, key court judgements, including the Mabo ruling, have improved the lives of many.

    But he says he says parliament should have struck after 1967 with bold legislation while the iron was hot to include a preamble in the constitution acknowledging the country’s indigenous people and started talks on a treaty with its dispossessed peoples.

    http://bigpondnews.com/articles/TopStories/2012/05/30/Aust_paralysed_on_indigenous_rights_755442.html

  134. I realise it’s been awhile since I’ve been to the Cafe, but thought it might be time to pop my head up again.

    A couple of things in this thread though, I wanted to address. First, is AIME.

    How many disadvantaged schools are they in? Almost none. They certainly aren’t in the States where the biggest problems are (WA,NT). I’m just sick and tired of people who choose the easy answers (like mentoring kids who are of mostly European heritage at places like Scotch College, Trinity College and others here in Melbourne) instead of doing the hard yards. It annoys me more that everyone is fainting and falling all over themselves to congratulate this young bloke – deceiving themselves from the truth that he isn’t closing the gap, just widening another. Many of my nieces and nephews have no hope of competing on any level with their fair-skinned Urban counterparts. More often than not, they have lower levels of literacy than their parents and grandparents.

    But, he wears a hoodie to the office, so he must be doing something good.

    As for Sorry Day, I really think we have to mature as a country, and investigate the Stolen Generation claims. Do you know that I qualify as ‘stolen generation’? With all the tweaking of classifications, the mere fact that I was placed with white foster parents in the 70’s makes it so. It doesn’t matter that I was placed there by family, that I had a wonderful upbringing and was kept in constant contact with my relatives, had ongoing access to my culture and always knew who I was, where I came from.

    What happened to someone like Bruce Trevorrow is tragic. But I know the reality behind a large number of fosterings that happened in the 70’s and 80’s (my foster parents cared for more than 50 Aboriginal kids in their lifetime as did a few of their friends), and it is an insult to know that I am included in the numbers that have been used to shame this country. It is highly insulting – to my parents (both sets) and to myself. I am grateful every day that I had the life that I did. Don’t feel sorry for me, please.

  135. I’d be interested in your take on Chris Sarra’s “Stronger Smarter” programs BST. Is this a step in the right direction in your opinion?

  136. You’re definitely getting better (or getting better drugs 😉 ) – you’re getting cheeky again 😆

  137. Cu, thank you for that link. I had the honour to meet with Justice Kirby while he was in Lismore confering with (now Magistrate) David Heilpern writing the foreward to his book on the sexual assault of young prisoners.

  138. Bacchus – On the face of it, some good ideas. Best of all, it is going to be rolled out where it is needed the most, remote areas where the kids are really getting the shaft in education. He’s been Principal at a failing school (Cherbourg) and introduced some excellent measures to help those kids, I’m hoping he has all the success in the world.

    Miglo – Good to be back!

  139. BST, most definitely welcome back. 🙂

    Yes, many kids do get into elite schools on indigenous scholarships when they are clearly not from disadvantaged backgrounds. But I’d like to see Bolt take that one one..that isn’t going to happen.

    I’m going to choke on my own words, but this is where some indigenous with only a small smattering of the blood do take advantage of the system.

    I agree, there are many indigenous who were provided with the best of both worlds, but that is a minority and it is only because of your wonderful foster parents that you were provided with this. Most indigenous kids were taken for no other reason than that their skin was whiter than their brothers and sisters..not because of concern for their wellbeing, but because of the colour of their skin.

    **note I use the word indigenous because my Granddaughters are a mix of Aboriginal and TSI..so indigenous is the preferred term up in Cairns.

  140. Bacchus and,

    You’re definitely getting better (or getting better drugs 😉 ) – you’re getting cheeky again 😆

    When did he ever stop!! Migs and cheeky are most definitely the best partners.

  141. BST, I once went on a camp at Camp Coorong. One of the Trevorrows was telling me he remembered that as a boy all the kids in the community would run and hide in the scrub at the approach of an unfamiliar vehicle. They knew the white people wanted to take them away. It was their greatest fear.

  142. Migs, my granny at Tungamah used to hide the women and children when the police did the rounds. She was the local midwife having trained at Guys Hospital London. I believe her stories.

  143. Min – I’m definitely not saying there weren’t awful stories, but I think that the outrage over the Stolen Generations needs to be tempered. We have done a massive disservice to our own cause by some in the ‘industry’ being dishonest about numbers (as well as some things stated as fact) and what I see as a revolution to go so completely in the opposite direction, sometimes to the detriment of those with no voice.

    Instead of worrying about getting at-risk kids into the home that is the best fit for them (and as we hear constantly, we have a chronic shortage of foster carers – too many kids, not enough homes), culture can take priority when there are far bigger concerns that should come first. When you query as to why this is so, you’re met with the response of ‘we don’t want another Stolen Generation’. I remember reading, tears in my eyes, the Coroners Report for that poor young girl (Deborah Melville) who was fostered by her Aunt and was left to die in the backyard. Welfare authorities, over a very long period, witnessed neglect, truancy, alcohol abuse and a house described repeatedly as ‘filthy’, yet were unwilling to remove her, as her only other option was being fostered with a family who were not Aboriginal.

    Hysteria has created the inability to make logical and rational decisions in child protection these days it seems. Yes, wherever a child can be placed in a kinship foster arrangement, it should be a serious first consideration if the family are suitable, willing and have support in place. It just shouldn’t be the only option on offer.

    On the flipside, I have one incredible cousin who has a large family of her own, as well as foster kids (when her sister passed away and another went right off the rails, she stepped in) – she has done so well and gets little or no support from the very people who proclaim loudly to do just that. At present, she is fighting to retain custody of two of the children she kinship fosters. Roughly two months ago, someone in their infinite wisdom decided she has too many kids in her care. They aren’t neglected, never truant, are fed healthy meals every day, definitely well loved, connected to their culture – but she apparently the numbers aren’t working for someone in a department somewhere.

    Here’s the kicker though, they want these children taken from her to be placed with a white family. No guarantee she will get to see them again, and no effort made to place them with any other family in a kinship role, despite a few contenders. It boggles the mind and I find myself at different times on both sides of the argument on this one. I do think culture is so much more important than an arbitrarily decided quota being enforced in one case (where there is no neglect, and no other reason for removal), yet can argue equally as passionately that better a good white home, than a home like Deborah was given. The devil is in the detail, and I think this is something we overlook when we have policies that don’t really have the best interests of each child at heart, instead, are often thought up at a feel-good conference by people with little real world experience in the trenches, and drafted without thought to how they will apply in a wide range of circumstances.

    Roswell – Glad to see you as well my friend – am looking forward to adding to our history of great chats 😉

  144. Migs – The Bruce and his immediate family settled in Victoria a few years back, down in Gippsland. Sad end to his life unfortunately, and after what he suffered through it was certainly not the happy ending I imagine he thought would await him after winning his court case.

    I would love to hear more stolen stories. I find that although education can open my eyes, I’ve done my best ‘learning’ through empathy and opening myself up to see things from anothers point of view.

  145. BST, your story reminds me of one from my own indigenous inlaws. At grandie’s christening there was not enough room to park the cars in front of the house and so a number of the (very) extensive family parked a street or two away. D-i-l’s sister laughed as she saw the contingency of black faces walking up the street: “Quick get out the baracades”, she chortled…this was in a predominantly white neighbourhood.

    It’s not that the families don’t do well, and the g/grannie who is full blood TSI proudly proclaims that not one single family member has ever been on the dole (and even if there was, they wouldn’t be game to let Nanny Lyn know about it)..it gets back to expectations and family. Unfortunately not every indigenous kid is as lucky.

  146. Bacchus, I wish I could say I’m on the mend but I’m afraid that this virus has hit me for six.

    Must be the drugs then Migs :mrgreen:

  147. Min – Expectations and family, you are spot on the money there. I’d vote your Granny to head of Aboriginal Affairs in a heartbeat.

  148. I received an email petition from Getup! regarding Ranjini and her young sons who were slapped into indefinite detention three weeks ago. They have no right of appeal.

    Right now, the Attorney-General is considering a proposal to change that by setting up an independent appeals process for ASIO decisions that are currently kept in the dark: no oversight, no checks and balances.

    Tomorrow at dusk, local GetUp members will gather by candlelight outside her Melbourne electorate office to deliver this national petition for justice. We have 36 hours left to show that Australians from every corner of the country stand with them for justice.

    Getup! asks for our support by signing their online petition.

    http://www.getup.org.au/campaigns/refugees/asio/spread-the-word

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