Queensland Votes Live Commentary

G’day. My name’s Alex and this is my first (and hopefully not last) post on Cafe Whispers.  It’s quite an honour to be posting to a blog I’ve read for a while now. Oh you can read a little more about me here.

Anyone who has been paying attention to the news over the last few weeks will know that Queensland is currently in the grips of a state election. Queenslanders will be heading to the polls on 24 March to elect a new government. The unicameral system of parliament adopted by Queensland makes for cut-throat campaigning as political parties and independents vie for votes for the all important seat in the Legislative Assembly.

The campaigning has already been feverish with the LNP, led by Campbell Newman, and Labor, led by Anna Bligh, duking it out.

There has already been some excellent commentary about the prospects of the major parties and the various opinion polls. There can be no doubt that the aggressive campaigning by the Greens and Bob Katter’s Australian Party will spook the major parties and it will be interesting to see how the major parties respond.

So far it seems like LNP and Labor are sticking to the familiar campaign formula of kissing babies, stump speeches and true-believer functions. Even though both the major parties have suffered the usual slings and arrows about candidates, where they live and their membership to swingers’ clubs, such things seem par-for-the-course in Queensland politics doing little damage to either party.

But with polling day still a days away, there is still more than enough time for the campaigns to get wacky (or wackier). I expect a lot of wackiness from Bob Katter’s Australian Party with the fanfare we saw last year as Bob showed his new class of politicians how to campaign Katter-Queensland style.

We will definitely see a plethora of visits by Bligh and Newman as their respective campaigns attempt to blitz electorates by cramming letterboxes with leaflets; round-a-bout squatting and going to every single community event and fete. And that’s not to mention the inundation of political advertising on TV, radio, online and in print.

With Queensland Labor fighting to keep the expected outcome respectable, and Can Do Campbell refusing to answer questions of policy costings and his so-called dealings while Mayor of Brisbane City Council, we can expect a thoroughly interesting finale to the state election campaign.

Although I say that as an election junkie.

Join me on 24 March from 7.30pm (AEDST) as I provide live commentary on the commentary and deliver my own opinions and analyses as the results come in. It’s interactive so you can join in and give your own thoughts and opinions. Click to get a reminder now.

136 comments on “Queensland Votes Live Commentary

  1. Alex, my youngest lives in Ashgrove..it’s not looking all that good for Campbell Newman to win his own seat, in her opinion. Let’s just hope that she’s right.

  2. Hi alex and welcome to the Café. You do realise that as a newbie, you have to get the drinks in for the next week? 😀

    Interesting post and I’ll be looking forward to your take on the Qld election frenzy in the last few days and on polling day.

    I notice from your post that Can Do has adopted the Liars Party strategy of refusing to release policy costings, so Qlders should be prepared for Newman’s hands to be up to his elbows in their pockets looking for the money to finance his programs.

    I say this with caution, because it may happen that he won’t win Ashgrove. It will be very interesting to witness the internecine savagery as the LNP brawls over who gets the top job.

  3. Jane, would that be any different to the Labor Party. You are obviously a Labor Supporter, probably a Labor Party Member, although I understand actual members are hard to find to stand the candidates or man the polls, outside Brisbane. Now your claim that the LNP is the Liar Party, I think recent news has been that Labor has been big on the Lies and mud slinging, and I would suggest that were the LNP to do as Labor there would be the symbolic blood in the streets. Thank goodness some one is a little more conservative about their claims and aspirations, the LNP.

  4. Excellent post Alex. It seems the LNP will form government in Qld after Saturday – it remains to be seen whether they can hold it together long enough to outlast the Borbidge government (28 months) once there though 😆

  5. Welcome to the Cafe, Alex and thank you for your astute post. I will be watching the outcomes with interest and follow your blog in between other business.

    I too hope to see many more posts from you.

    Great work.

  6. A looming scenario is a win for the LNP and a loss for Newman … although I’ve never been a “fan” of Campbell Newman, I shudder to think who would lead the LNP if Labor do hold Ashgrove … anything is possible it would seem …

    This morning, a Newspoll in The Australian newspaper shows Mr Newman remains in a tight contest for the crucial Brisbane seat of Ashgrove against Labor incumbent Kate Jones.

    Just eight days out from the election, the survey gives Mr Newman 49 per cent of the primary vote compared to Ms Jones on 44 per cent.

    It says Mr Newman has 52 per cent support on a two-party preferred basis when likely preferences are factored in, with Ms Jones on 48 per cent.

    But it shows most Ashgrove voters – 53 per cent – still want Ms Jones as preferred MP compared to 43 per cent for Mr Newman.

    However, the poll of 504 voters has a 4.5 per cent margin for error, which suggests a close result.

    The other major issue that no-one seems to mention/notice, is that the LNP is owned, lock, stock and barrel by, Clivey Palmer … wonder whose been paying Newman’s wage, since he resigned from the BCC?

  7. Well if a complete absence of policies and costings comes under your heading of “a little more conservative”, then I have to say you’re right.

    I also think you should stop attending Liars Party indoctrination camps, throw away the Liars Party hymn sheet and acquaint your self with some facts. The truth is out there for you, none of which gives any credence to your parrotting of Liars Party crapaganda.

    Here’s just a few of Sneerleader’s lies:

    BER: the following link provides the facts about BER, although I doubt that you are honestly interested in the facts or the tuth.

    http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/BuildingTheEducationRevolution/Pages/berit_news.aspx

    For further reading I direct you to JohnL’s post on The Political Sword, where you will find a detailed list of Liars party lies, misinformation and plain old bullshit about BER.

    http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/default.aspx

    Alcoa Lies-Sneerleader claimed in February 2012 that Alcoa’s decision to review the viability of its Point Henry aluminium smelter was due to the carbon pricing legislation, despite the fact that the MD of Alcoa had directly refuted the claim.

    Not satisfied with that BIG FAT LIE, Sneerleader went on to verbal Alcoa again, by claiming that they would delay the $3bn aluminium refinery in Wagerup, WA due to the impending carbon price legislation.

    Once again, Sneerleader was caught out in another baseless BIG, FAT, LIE when Alcoa released a statement that the delay was due to its inability to obtain a satisfactory supply of natural gas.

    More Carbon Price Lies: Claims by the Liars Party that QANTAS and other airlines had increased their fares due to the impending carbon pricing legislation. Yet another BIG FAT PORKY by our intrepid LOTO, refuted by the airlines. The increase was in response to carbon pricing imposed in Europe.

    HWK Howarth audit lies: Sneerleader claims that Liars budgetary goals had been audited by the accountancy firm, more verballing. NO PROPER AUDIT WAS CONDUCTED! But hey! This is good old Liealot. he wouldn’t lie outright, would he? Bloody oath he would!

    HIP Deaths Lies: Not one death which occurred during HIP was attributed to the government by the courts. 3 of the 4 deaths were due to employer breaches of OH & S directives (introduced by Peter Garrett, btw) and the remaining death was due to the employee directly ignoring the direct instructions of the employer.

    You may remember the unwarranted, gutless and disgusting accusations of industrial murder directed at Peter Garrett by the Liars Party and their shrill barrackers. Or does that not meet your definition of mud slinging.

    I have listed just a few of the egregious lies knowingly spruiked by the Liars Party and its inglorious leader.

    That you choose to believe them in the face of all the evidence to the contrary, speaks volumes about you. That and the usual complete absence of any evidence of this so-called lying and mud slinging.

    Don’t bother with the so-called carbon tax lie meme. What the PM actually said on election eve 2010 is in the public domain; no doubt you ignore it because it doesn’t fit Liars Party propagana.

  8. Who do you think it will be if Newman misses out TB? Lawrence Springborg? John-Paul Langbroek? Tim Nicholls?

    The old Country Party vs Liberals fiasco will be on for young and old!

  9. Thanks everyone for your warm welcomes.

    Min: I sure hope your youngest is right about Ashgrove. Something that I have enjoyed watching is how Ashgrove has become a lightning rod for lots of activists, regardless of their leaning. Ashgrove has definitely become the Bennelong of the Queensland election.

    Jane: D’oh no-one told me about getting the drinks but I’m happy to do what I can 🙂

    Newman and the LNP have refused at every given opportunity to release costings for their policies. In fact Campbell sounds much like a sales agent declaring to Queenslanders that they should trust him on the costings. In general those kind of statements should annoy Queenslanders but their real worry is how easily the LNP just disappears policies. Case in point the LNP pledge on transparency and accountability – http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/lnp-dumps-election-pledge/story-fnbt5t29-1226303331683

    The fact that the LNP is dumping such a policy in the week prior to the election should have alarm bells ringing at fever pitch.

    Bacchus: Thanks. I think you’re right about the challenge for the LNP is holding onto government. It seemed like Borbidge started out okay and he had even dumped the Sir Joh hang-over, something many pundits at the time thought would be impossible for future Nationals leaders. But he ran afoul and somehow dropped the ball and when he faced off with a revitalised and aggressive ALP campaign he went to water and failed to take full advantage of being the encumbent.

    Given the kind of history between some of the key senior LNP people, Newman may find himself under the pump internally (if he wins Ashgrove) and possibly to the point of distraction. I’m sure Langbroek and his ilk will happily fuel dissent against the dear leader.

    Miglo: Thanks. I’ll keep serving up posts for as long as Cafe Whispers is prepared to take them 🙂

  10. The old Country Party vs Liberals fiasco will be on for young and old!

    That’s my point, Baccy …

    Problem is the Bligh Government IS a bad government … they lurch from crisis to crisis of their own making …

    … and the parliament is like a high school playground …

    … my local Labor candidate is the daughter of the previous state member for my electorate (she’s been elected for at least two terms now) but personally I have a problem with political dynasties … Clivey tried to get his 19 yo elected last time if you remember … not sure this time …

    Quite frankly I’d rather NOT vote … and may just take along a red texta pen and put a bright red cross across the ballot paper in protest!

    One of my kids is saying that at least Katter tells it the way it is and he might vote for him! WTF! The issues of bringing kids up to be free thinkers!!!

    (I useed to get sKattergun on the planes between Brissy and Townsville – up and down … on and fkn on … Wanker One)

  11. TB,

    My thinking at the moment is that it’s going to be a rout – we’ve seen in Canberra how bad a totally useless opposition is in having parliament work properly, and that also applies to the current Qld situation.

    If we only have a cricket team as opposition to the LNP clowns in government, we can only possibly get much worse government that that which we’ve currently got here.

    I was going to look at a vote for a minor party or independent on Saturday, but I’ve got to stick with Labor to try to limit the damage these clowns are about to inflict on this state.

    My hope is that Newman is not successful – that will bring home to the electorate much more quickly the reality of the incompetents they’ve we’ve voted for.

    As an aside, son moved out of here about a month ago – he jokingly said he was going to move into the Ashgrove electorate just so he could vote against Campbell Newman. 😆 (He’s in Brisbane Central.)

  12. Baccy,

    I will vote Labor too for the same reasons … I’ve posted somewhere this week that the problem with a waek Opposition in a one chamber parliament will take us back (eventually) to the days of JBP … absolute power corrupts absolutely but nowhere more than politics …

    I might add that the ads showing Mrs Newman’s family connections and Mr Newman’s $70, 000 donations ($10000 at a time from different companies via the same bloke — didn’t Gordon Nuttall go to jail for that?)

  13. Ooops … missed a bit …

    I might add that the ads showing Mrs Newman’s family connections and Mr Newman’s $70, 000 donations ($10000 at a time from different companies via the same bloke — didn’t Gordon Nuttall go to jail for that?) … are still running … you would think that if they were wrong, defamatory or just downright made up the ALP would have been forced to remove them by now?

  14. As I see it, the trouble for Queensland is an incumbent government which is way past its use by date and an opposition which is a rabble which probably shouldn’t be allowed to run a chook raffle.

    Just from what our resident Quincelanders say, if you re-elect labor, you get a government which has been in power for far too long and has been running on empty for the last 10 years a least.

    Then you have the opposition which always has been and possibly always will be, a dishonest rabble still tainted with the Joh legacy.

    However, it looks as if government will change hands on Saturday and labor will be out in the cold for a couple of terms.

    Twenty odd years ago the same thing happened in SA after the State Bank collapse and the recession hit. Labor was reduced to 10 seats, but they came back.

    Politics-boom or bust!

  15. Similar TB – Nuttall was using the money to buy properties for his family, rather than for campaign funds from memory. Yes, there is something not quite right around the Newman & Monsour familes though – more robber barons using positions of power and influence to feather their own nests 😉

    Pretty well got Qld politics in one there Jane – the question will be how long before Labor bounce back – we know the LNP are clowns; how long till they remove all doubt from the mind of the electorate…

  16. … how long till they remove all doubt from the mind of the electorate…

    The real problem is what the LNP will remove from the state! Oh, wait, Anna and Andrew sold almost everything off … and then leased the rest …**

    Wot’s Can’tDo Campbell’s game then??

    ** Most of the infrastrucure that the ALP government has developed poured money into is now in private hands … bridges, roads, railways …

  17. Wot’s Can’tDo Campbell’s game then??

    “power and influence to feather their own nests” – Make the “right” decisions to allow developments; reduce the possibility of ordinary folk appealing aginst whatever the ruling classes want to do to amass ever more wealth…

  18. Baccy, jane, yes and yes … The Robber Barons have simply been allowed to highjack democracy both here and the USA … its bloodless but still a coup …

    … it also demonstrates the naievity of poorer pollies who have been coerced by the pollies with money …

    Strange that they all have multi millionaire wives? Rudd (remember him?) and Newman? And much of the “profit” gleaned from government coffers …

    Just need to grease the tumbrills and I’m ready when you are …

    Alex, mine’s a Wild Turkey, two blocks of ice and a little soda, thanks … 🙂

  19. How could anybody forget the two blocks of ice? From what I remember you even counted them when the waitress served your drink at Jupiters. :mrgreen:

  20. Bacchus/TB,

    I’m glad you blokes are from Qld. Your comments will be most valuable here on Saturday.

    But aren’t they always. 😛

  21. … and woe betide anyone who puts in too much ice. </i.

    yeah, Min!

    … and I received a bollickin’ “chastisement” from, The Minister, for that … (and well earned too) … and I do feel the guilts the waitress had no bloody idea … (“I’m not sure we have any Wild Turkey?” “Yes you do” – I’d already checked!) Anyway I was a bad lad … I did apologise to the lass later …

    I had an “experience” at my club a few months ago … the girl serving me overflowed the soda out of the glass … with the WT of course … I complained (with reason and nicely explained why) and said I’d be happy for her to tip some out and put another shot in … nah, couldn’t do that … had to throw it away and start again … just agreed and shook my head – the guy standing alongside me was just staring and shaking his too …

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    For Miggsy …

    QUEENSLANDER!

    .. and any Queenslander in the room of course!

  22. TB at 5.53pm

    I think you’re right about the privatisations and the flogging of public assets.

    It’s certainly left a sour taste in my mouth (along with the Traverston Dam fiasco)

    If I want a conservative government I can vote for the real thing in the full knowledge public purpose will get shafted. No surprises there.

    But I expect different from a Labor party.

    I won’t be helping the LNP, but I won’t be distraught next Saturday night when the Bligh government gets taught a hard lesson. A Newman defeat will be balm enough to soothe any tendency to grieving.

    Maybe a term or two in opposition will reacquaint them with Labor values.

  23. Miglo, don’t you know anything about rugby union? The Eels are from Sydney. The Knights are the Queensland team.

  24. It’s certainly left a sour taste in my mouth (along with the Traverston Dam fiasco)

    MJ, I’m a major disbeliever in rock stars (or any other so-called celebrities) becoming pollies let alone, Ministers … Peter Garrett is a walking overpaid disaster … I recently checked out the National Curriculum … what an amateur travesty!

    To the point … however … Traveston was Garrett’s first travesty! … the Beattie/Bligh governments did all the right things apart from buying propertie BEFORE federal approval … what a double bungle that was … hadit been approved ???

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    … and for Miggles … my son-in-law (currently working at a gold mine in the middle of the desert in Saudi A) is an Eels fan … and yes, he valiantly puts up with the shit from us BRONCOS! fans! But then he is a Kiwi and his “real” football is union … the only time I’ve seen him cry (yep, cry) was when NZ lost the World Cup to Australia … a wonderful son BTW! Blessed with a wealth of family … no fkn money but WGAF! 😀

  25. Union? Union? that is the toff’s game. a game where they prefer to kick a ball out of the field rather than run with it. a game where the commentator knows all the schools and sportsmasters of the players

    Eels are league

  26. Miglo, don’t you know anything about rugby union? The Eels are from Sydney. The Knights are the Queensland team.

    LOL! You’ll all keep …

    I might remind you that Australian Football isn’t … it is infact a hybrid of Irish Football (that’s why you lot send a team to Ireland to get flogged occasionally) … and rugby union – ball only! 😀

  27. Yes, Sue. Parramatta last time I looked. I believe Parramatta means the place of eels or something similar.

  28. Migs, I remember going to a union game with my old man (and he was no friggin’ gentleman!) … I nine and he was playing with the Territorial (reserves to you) Military Police and they got clobbered … gentlemen my arse!

    Speaking of gentlemen my old man told me that the worst teams he ‘d played were the Catholic priests … nasty bunch of swearin’, cheats – he reckoned … nothing changes – hey?

  29. Miglo
    It is where they spend the time speaking the Queen’s English, they do enjoy their scrummages. Blow the whistle and have a scrum, quite often by choice of the players.

  30. Do you know the definition of rugby? Three blokes trying to push two blokes up one bloke’s arse.

  31. TB, reminds me of a game of cricket played against the nuns from Our Lady Star of the Sea in Apollo Bay…the swearin’ that is…

  32. Can’t see it being very popular in Queensland thus

    Who won the 2011 Super Rugby Grand Final? In front of a crowd of 52,113 at Suncorp Stadium? (capacity 52,500)

    Son played schoolboy union and club league to a pretty good level (Metro rep in league & GPS 1st XV in union) and will tell you league is a better game to watch, but union is a much better game to play.

    The union rules make it more difficult to follow than league, but it is a more flowing and attacking game to play.

    I was a champion rugby player in my youth – captain of the U14B team that only won 1 match (by forfiet); broke my elbow at training at the start of the U15 year and retired :mrgreen:

  33. What a great loss that must have been to the game, Bacchus.

    I never had any major injuries during my ten years of playing Aussie Rules, but I caused a few.

    I was an animal on the field. A gentle pussy cat off it.

  34. Anyway, there’s an election in Queensland on Saturday. I do hope that Bronco’s fans know how to fill out a voting slip.

  35. I’m certain that Labor will be done like a dinner, however one thing that I’ll give to Bligh and that is I think that she did a sterling job during the Brisbane floods..pity about the rest of it tho’.

  36. Newman cannot get in. Can you imagine State of Origin time with Barrel O’lies and Can’t Do Campbell pretending to be footy fans. EEEECCCHHHH

  37. “Mangrove, don’t say you’re a Queenslander too!”

    By adoption only Migs, but after 4 decades starting to feel at home.

    The Bjelke-Petersen years were difficult. I hope we’re not going back there.

  38. What bothers me the most is that if the LNP take over … Clivey will want to buy the fkn Broncos and stuff the NRL! And he’s already stuffed up up FFA … and GCU …

    Money speaks alright … whatever happened to Australia’s “tall poppy syndrome”? All too busy playing on their mobile phones …

    Went to lunch yesterday with a couple we’ve known for almost thirty years (live next door and friends) … in the middle of the meal they were both playing with their mobile phones … at the same time … FFS!

    Ours (as usual) was switched off … we lived for years without ’em what changed? No-one seems any better informed?

  39. Alex welcome. The best thing about democracy (read Australian Governments) is that they get turfed out on a regular basis.

    I am a great believer in “same dung heap, different flies”. Over thirty years talking to elected reps will do that to you.

    The Australian political landscape, is, however changing. It is being sold off to the highest bidder (which of course means the best government money can buy) but not necessarily the best government.

    Australia is ahead of the USA and Europe, but not by much. Doesn’t matter anyway, shit creek in a barbed wire canoe, without a paddle is not far away.

    Can do Campbell is a wrongun, but sometimes the best medicine is bitter.

  40. Anna Bligh might get a few more votes, thanks to Clive Palmer.

    I been advised to checkout Lateline tomorrow. Clive Palmer is a guest and even for a Queenslander he is really weird. The conspiracies with the Greens, CIA go back to Whitlam.

    So something to look forward to tomorrow.

  41. Displacement behaviour, TB.

    What were you doing under the table !

    Siphoning up that drink that got spilled, MJ. Waste not, want not, right TB?

  42. They appear a little misinformed in Queensland, well at least the readers of the local online Murdoch media do. Queensland’s problems appear to be due to the carbon tax. Yes, the carbon tax. I know, I know, it hasn’t come into affect yet.

    Mind you, the Murdoch media is happy to push that line.

  43. Lunalava and The Australian political landscape, is, however changing. It is being sold off to the highest bidder..

    I was just thinking about this..and you’re right of course. But how/why is this happening. Once undue influence by the wealthy was severely frowned upon, now we seem to be taking this granted. Australia’s Tall Poppy syndrome used to do us a service in that if the wealthy were influencing the political process, that at least they had to keep reasonably quiet about it. Now it’s nothing for Gina, Twiggy and Clive to stand on the back of a ute and bleat about how they demand that the government do their bidding, and for no one’s benefit except their own.

  44. Roswell, hopefully by then the mess that they’re making in NSW and Vic will make the South Aussies ask themselves if wall to wall Liberal governments is such a good idea.

  45. I saw the campaign by the Straddie Mothers on the ABC earlier in the week, I wonder what the ABC will say about the “journalism”?

    “Thousands of letters have been sent to homes in the electorate from a group called ‘Straddie Mothers’ arguing against Labor’s plans to close down sand-mining operations on North Stradbroke Island, near Brisbane.

    The letters say the closures will hurt the island community and make it harder for locals to get jobs.

    Ms Jones says mining company Sibelco Australia has been bankrolling the campaign without lodging its interest with the Queensland Electoral Commission.

    “Worse than that, they have used Stradbroke mothers to pretend to Ashgrove voters that they were writing off their own bat to Ashgrove electors, when we know now the whole time this was paid for by the mining company,” she said.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-03-21/claims-surface-of-secret-lnp-deals/3903010

  46. I reckon it was a bit of an overreach promoting us here in QLD as “The smart state”…but we have had our moments under the Beattie and Bligh governments…

    at least they didn’t close down parts of tertiary education to accommodate sporting events…

    nor sack the electricity workers…

    Those who hope Campbell Newman loses in Ashgrove might regret it if a National party conservative takes the  leadership….particularly those associated with Clive Palmer…someone as eccentric and paranoid it seems as Jo Bjelke Peterson…

    MEMORIES:

    In 1972 Sir Joh strengthened the system to favour his own party, which led to his opponents referring to it as the “Bjelkemander,” a play on the term “gerrymander”. Although Bjelke-Petersen’s 1972 redistributions occasionally had elements of “gerrymandering” in the strict sense, their perceived unfairness was more because rural areas were granted more representation than their population would have dictated if electorates contained equal numbers of voters (or population).

    The lack of a state upper house (which Queensland had abolished in 1922) allowed legislation to be passed without the need to negotiate with other political parties.

    Despite public protests, several Brisbane heritage sites such as the Bellevue Hotel were demolished. Thirteen Liberal backbenchers supported Labor in parliament, condemning the destruction of the state government owned Bellevue. Former Liberal Parliamentarian, Terry Gygar, described the early morning scene at the Bellevue demolition; “A large crowd had gathered around the building. There was a cordon of police. They had thrown up a barbed … a mesh wire fence around it. And then the Deen Bros arrived, rolling through like an armoured division, straight through the crowd. People were knocked sideways. Police were dragging people out of the way. Parking meters were knocked over. Traffic signs were bent and twisted on the road. It looked like Stalingrad.” Bjelke-Petersen congratulated the contractors, the Deen Brothers, “on a job well done”

    Relations with the media

    Bjelke-Petersen’s government dominated Parliament, not allowing committees or impartial speech, and ran a very sophisticated media operation, sending press releases out right on deadline so journalists had very little chance to research news items. Journalists covering industrial disputes and picketing, were afraid of arrest. In 1985, the Australian Journalists Association withdrew from the system of police passes because of police refusal to accredit certain journalists. Some journalists experienced police harassment.

    Bjelke-Petersen’s manipulative approach to media at times became visible behind his tangled syntax, which frequently bemused interviewers. It was unknown whether he was joking, confused or saying what he really thought when he said: “The greatest thing that could happen to the state and nation is when we get rid of all the media… then we could live in peace and tranquility and no one would know anything.”

    Joh’s catchphrase answer to unwelcome queries, “Don’t you worry about that,” was widely parodied. Peterson was known to refer to this process of patronising journalists as “feeding the chooks”.

    Bjelke-Petersen responded to unfavourable media coverage by using government resources to sue for defamation on numerous occasions. The Queensland historian Ross Fitzgerald was threatened with criminal libel when he sought to publish a critical history.

    According to Lane, one of Bjelke-Petersen’s closest ministerial allies, Bjelke-Petersen saw street marchers as a menace who clogged up traffic, caused distress to pedestrians, motorists and shop keepers, and were mainly made up of “grubby left wing students, Anarchists, professional agitators and trade union activists”.

    The government transferred 450 police from country areas to suppress anti-apartheid demonstrations. Future Queensland Premier Peter Beattie, then a student protestor, witnessed police violently attacking peaceful demonstrators, including women.

    Brisbane aboriginal activist, Sam Watson claimed the police wanted to “smash and cripple and destroy”. Bjelke-Petersen praised police conduct during the demonstrations and awarded them an extra day’s leave.

    Peter Beattie said that, “…if you went to a protest there was always photos being taken”. “You know, you’d always pose to get your best side. (Laughs) And they had a dossier on everybody”, Beattie said.

    Bjelke-Petersen rejected recommendations by the police minister, Max Hodges, and the police commissioner, Ray Whitrod, who sought an inquiry into an incident in 1976 where a police officer struck a student with a baton during a demonstration.  Bjelke-Petersen told Whitrod that the cabinet, not the Commissioner, would decide if an investigation was warranted. The Queensland Police Union sent a letter of thanks to the Premier and offered support. Hodges was replaced as police minister soon after.

    Secure in the knowledge that they had the Premier’s backing, police officers continued to act provocatively, most notably in a raid on a commune at Cedar Bay later that year.

    The police, who had been looking for marijuana, torched the residents’ houses and destroyed their property. Whitrod sought an inquiry but the results were never revealed.

    After seven years as police commissioner, Whitrod resigned, saying he could no longer tolerate political interference and the police commissioner had become a political puppet. He was replaced by Terry Lewis who had been previously promoted to Assistant Commissioner, against Whitrod’s recommendation, over the heads of 122 officers of higher or equal rank. Whitrod had already told the new police Minister, “everybody in the police force knows that Lewis is corrupt. Now if he’s appointed assistant commissioner, it will nullify all my efforts’, and the new Minister said, ‘I will talk to the Premier’. And about an hour or so later the Minister rung me up and said, ‘The Premier does not want to see you, nor will he allow you to address cabinet’.”  

    I reckon it was a bit of an overreach promoting us here in QLD as “The smart state”…but we have had our moments under the Beattie and Bligh governments…

    at least they didn’t close down parts of tertiary education to accommodate sporting events…

    nor sack the electricity workers…

    Those who hope Campbell Newman loses in Ashgrove might regret it if a National party conservative takes the  leadership….particularly those associated with Clive Palmer…someone as eccentric and paranoid it seems as Jo Bjelke Peterson…

    MEMORIES:

    In 1972 Sir Joh strengthened the system to favour his own party, which led to his opponents referring to it as the “Bjelkemander,” a play on the term “gerrymander”. Although Bjelke-Petersen’s 1972 redistributions occasionally had elements of “gerrymandering” in the strict sense, their perceived unfairness was more because rural areas were granted more representation than their population would have dictated if electorates contained equal numbers of voters (or population).

    The lack of a state upper house (which Queensland had abolished in 1922) allowed legislation to be passed without the need to negotiate with other political parties.

    Despite public protests, several Brisbane heritage sites such as the Bellevue Hotel were demolished. Thirteen Liberal backbenchers supported Labor in parliament, condemning the destruction of the state government owned Bellevue. Former Liberal Parliamentarian, Terry Gygar, described the early morning scene at the Bellevue demolition; “A large crowd had gathered around the building. There was a cordon of police. They had thrown up a barbed … a mesh wire fence around it. And then the Deen Bros arrived, rolling through like an armoured division, straight through the crowd. People were knocked sideways. Police were dragging people out of the way. Parking meters were knocked over. Traffic signs were bent and twisted on the road. It looked like Stalingrad.” Bjelke-Petersen congratulated the contractors, the Deen Brothers, “on a job well done”

    Relations with the media

    Bjelke-Petersen’s government dominated Parliament, not allowing committees or impartial speech, and ran a very sophisticated media operation, sending press releases out right on deadline so journalists had very little chance to research news items. Journalists covering industrial disputes and picketing, were afraid of arrest. In 1985, the Australian Journalists Association withdrew from the system of police passes because of police refusal to accredit certain journalists. Some journalists experienced police harassment.

    Bjelke-Petersen’s manipulative approach to media at times became visible behind his tangled syntax, which frequently bemused interviewers. It was unknown whether he was joking, confused or saying what he really thought when he said: “The greatest thing that could happen to the state and nation is when we get rid of all the media… then we could live in peace and tranquility and no one would know anything.”

    Joh’s catchphrase answer to unwelcome queries, “Don’t you worry about that,” was widely parodied. Peterson was known to refer to this process of patronising journalists as “feeding the chooks”.

    Bjelke-Petersen responded to unfavourable media coverage by using government resources to sue for defamation on numerous occasions. The Queensland historian Ross Fitzgerald was threatened with criminal libel when he sought to publish a critical history.

    According to Lane, one of Bjelke-Petersen’s closest ministerial allies, Bjelke-Petersen saw street marchers as a menace who clogged up traffic, caused distress to pedestrians, motorists and shop keepers, and were mainly made up of “grubby left wing students, Anarchists, professional agitators and trade union activists”.

    The government transferred 450 police from country areas to suppress anti-apartheid demonstrations. Future Queensland Premier Peter Beattie, then a student protestor, witnessed police violently attacking peaceful demonstrators, including women.

    Brisbane aboriginal activist, Sam Watson claimed the police wanted to “smash and cripple and destroy”. Bjelke-Petersen praised police conduct during the demonstrations and awarded them an extra day’s leave.

    Peter Beattie said that, “…if you went to a protest there was always photos being taken”. “You know, you’d always pose to get your best side. (Laughs) And they had a dossier on everybody”, Beattie said.

    Bjelke-Petersen rejected recommendations by the police minister, Max Hodges, and the police commissioner, Ray Whitrod, who sought an inquiry into an incident in 1976 where a police officer struck a student with a baton during a demonstration.  Bjelke-Petersen told Whitrod that the cabinet, not the Commissioner, would decide if an investigation was warranted. The Queensland Police Union sent a letter of thanks to the Premier and offered support. Hodges was replaced as police minister soon after.

    Secure in the knowledge that they had the Premier’s backing, police officers continued to act provocatively, most notably in a raid on a commune at Cedar Bay later that year.

    The police, who had been looking for marijuana, torched the residents’ houses and destroyed their property. Whitrod sought an inquiry but the results were never revealed.

    After seven years as police commissioner, Whitrod resigned, saying he could no longer tolerate political interference and the police commissioner had become a political puppet. He was replaced by Terry Lewis who had been previously promoted to Assistant Commissioner, against Whitrod’s recommendation, over the heads of 122 officers of higher or equal rank. Whitrod had already told the new police Minister, “everybody in the police force knows that Lewis is corrupt. Now if he’s appointed assistant commissioner, it will nullify all my efforts’, and the new Minister said, ‘I will talk to the Premier’. And about an hour or so later the Minister rung me up and said, ‘The Premier does not want to see you, nor will he allow you to address cabinet’.”  

    Whitrod said that he hoped his resignation would send a message to the people of Queensland; “that something very seriously was going wrong with the Queensland police force and with their Premier”.

    In 1977, Bjelke-Petersen announced that “the day of street marches is over.” He further added. “Don’t bother applying for a march permit. You won’t get one. That’s government policy now!” Liberal parliamentarians crossed the floor defending the right of association and assembly.

    Colin Lamont, one of the Liberals, told a meeting at the University of Queensland that the Premier was engineering confrontation for electoral purposes. “Two hours later, he (Bjelke-Petersen) lunged at me across the floor of Parliament, waving a tape recorder and spluttered, ‘I’ve heard every word. You are a traitor to this Government'”, Lamont wrote later. Lamont said he learned the Special Branch had been keeping files on Liberal rebels and reporting, not to their Commissioner, but directly to the Premier. “The police state had arrived”, Lamont added.

    Aboriginal people

    In June 1976, Bjelke-Petersen blocked the proposed sale of a pastoral property on the Cape York Peninsula to a group of Aboriginal people, because according to cabinet policy, “The Queensland Government does not view favourably proposals to acquire large areas of additional freehold or leasehold land for development by Aborigines or Aboriginal groups in isolation.”

    This dispute resulted in the case of Koowarta v Bjelke-Petersen, which was decided partly in the High Court in 1982, and partly in the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1988. The courts found that Bjelke-Petersen’s policy had discriminated against Aboriginal people.

    Also in 1976, Bjelke-Petersen evicted a team treating trachoma, led by Fred Hollows from state-controlled Aboriginal land. Bjelke-Petersen claimed that Hollows’ team had been encouraging Aborigines to enrol to vote.

    In his visits to northern communities, Fred Hollows was accompanied by two respected Aboriginal spokesmen and civil rights activists, Mick Miller and Clarrie Grogan. With an election looming, and keen to shut down this source of independent information, the Premier simply ejected Hollows’ team. Electoral office data refuting his claims that there had been a rush of voter enrolments in the wake of the trachoma team, was not released for public consumption.
    (Wikipedia)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joh_Bjelke-Petersen

    In three years we could be transformed into the backward, loopy, undemocratic state…again.

    N’

  47. Another reminder…from January 2009:

    7:30 Report, ABC

    JOHN TAYLOR: Lawrence Springborg staked his political career on merging the Queensland Liberals and Nationals into one distinct party. It was a bitter struggle, but he won.

    LAWRENCE SPRINGBORG: That gives us a really sound base. It doesn’t put us in the box seat, but it gives us a sound base where we can absolutely focus on the interests of Queenslanders and the alternative in this state.

    SCOTT PRASSER: I think it’s superficially united and it certainly has removed a lot of problems that the Coalition forces had in the past. The real test of this party is gonna be if they don’t get up.

    JOHN TAYLOR: One keen backer of the merger was this man, Clive Palmer. He’s a billionaire, a mining magnate, developer and owner of a Gold Coast soccer team.

    CLIVE PALMER, BUSINESSMAN: Well I’m just a Queenslander like you are and hoping we get good government in the next election and trying to contribute to the community that I live in

    ANNA BLIGH: Well, I think there are some very serious and legitimate questions to be asked. Clive Palmer is Australia’s richest man. He has a long history with the National Party.

    JOHN TAYLOR: Clive Palmer’s involvement in Queensland conservative politics goes back a long way to Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen’s Government, when the Liberals were often the enemy as much as Labor.

    PRESENTER (archive footage, 1986, 7.30 Report): But you’re a crony, aren’t you?

    CLIVE PALMER: Certainly not. I mean, what is a crony? Are you a crony? This is a lot of allegations that the Liberal Party throws about because they’re desperate.

    JOHN TAYLOR: He’s been a National Party director and spokesman, he’s an honorary life member and now is a senior official in the new Liberal Party.

    CLIVE PALMER: It’s a beat-up just to say that I’ve got a lot of influence in the party, which I don’t have, you know? That I’m making demands on the politicians, which I’m not. And if you talk to Lawrence or to the President of the party – anyone – they’ll tell you that we’ve never ever made a demand or a request for them to assist us in any way. You know, when you’re the wealthiest man in Australia, you don’t need to.

    JOHN TAYLOR: Mr Palmer has helped out. Lawrence Springborg and his politicians have used the billionaire’s helicopters and had the opportunity to use his DC9 jet.

    CLIVE PALMER: Politics is, you know, it can be an art of what you make it. And the Labor Party’s made a lot out of those things. Of course, they’re lacking in policy and other areas.

    JOHN TAYLOR: In Brisbane’s northern suburbs, Clive Palmer’s teenage son is even running for office. The billboards are authorised by … dad.

    CLIVE PALMER: I haven’t discussed it with my wife and if I put too much money in it, I’d be in a lot of trouble, to be honest with you, mate. I can only do what she agrees to, right? But I think, you know, for my son, for his campaign, I think we’ll probably contribute something like $50,000 or something of that sort of range. I wouldn’t think it’d be that much higher for the party, really.

    JOHN TAYLOR: Last year, Queensland introduced new laws for greater and faster public disclosure of donations to political parties. The Government was keen to know how much Clive Palmer was giving the LNP. The donations register will be revealed next week, but already, it’s known that Clive Palmer has not donated more than $100,000 in the last financial year.

    LAWRENCE SPRINGBORG: But this is just the politics of personal character assassination of Labor. They’re very envious of people that have actually made it despite the best efforts of their Government to actually drag down the business community in Queensland.

    ANNA BLIGH: It’s not unusual for very wealthy people to buy a football team, which Mr Palmer’s done. But in the Australian democracy, it’s pretty rare for someone to buy a political party. And I think the real question is: what does Mr Palmer expect in return?

    http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2008/s2478752.htm

    Hmmm….

    Plus ce change…

    N’

  48. Thanks for the quick trip down memory lane, Nask.

    Lest we forget.

    PS I remember the Grogan family (from Kuranda). They were highly respected by both the white and Aboriginal community.

  49. Nas’, I would like to 2nd Mangrove Jack’s thank you.

    Also in 1976, Bjelke-Petersen evicted a team treating trachoma, led by Fred Hollows from state-controlled Aboriginal land. Bjelke-Petersen claimed that Hollows’ team had been encouraging Aborigines to enrol to vote.

    Sometimes people forget how recent is this history, especially when you have the likes of Tony Abbott infering that Aboriginal people should just get over it.

  50. As a voter in Q’land,I’m still waiting for ‘can do’s’ policy costings,11 billion black hole comes to mind.

  51. Cheers Min & Mangrove Jack.

    Ya know, even Newman has had chats with Palmer.

    It’s worrying that such an unpredictable man with so much money and assets could have such influence on our politics.

    Palmer has similar idiosyncratic and bumbling bully characteristics as Jo…

    He really goes ape on occasion if he doesn’t get his way or if opposed…the battle with the Soccer Federation and Frank Lowy a case in point.

    And his threat previously sue Anna Bligh and others.

    Not to mention the silly threat to go to court over the MRRT.

    And Tony Abbott reckons “he’s a character”.

    Yep, just the type catered to by the opportunistic unpredictable weathervane using One Nation/Tea party style tactics in order to protect the privileged supporters.

    Abbott’s a puppet on a string…or leash.

    N’

  52. Nas’, that Palmer is a character cannot be doubted, but what sort of character is open to debate. Palmer has apparently now backed away from a High Court challenge over the MRRT and is leaving that one up to Twiggy.

  53. Min said :Palmer has apparently now backed away from a High Court challenge over the MRRT and is leaving that one up to Twiggy.

    Ahhh Min,
    So it was just bluster…perhaps an empty threat to score political points for the Coalition?

    Whatever the motive it demonstrates his need to bully politicians who don’t agree with him.

    How lovely for QLD.

    N’

  54. These mega-rich mining barons are coming across as morally underdeveloped…unable to recognise that we are all in this together…did they protest and threaten court cases over the GST?…

    certainly many of the public were not in favour of it…Hewson lost an election over it…but it was eventually imposed on us by the Coalition…the people moaned but got on with their lives…paid the tax…

    a tax brought to us by a Coalition that now resists taxing the few…when it had no problem then taxing the many…regardless of the problems it caused for small business…

    the same small business sector that it is now going to deny a tax cut too when it votes in parliament…

    Tony Abbott is a short-term gain…but long-term disaster for the Coalition…

    they come across as confused weathervanes…wearing a black hole like a halo…and austerity measures like guns on a cowboy…

    these apologists and defenders of the mega-rich miners are an embarrassment to their country…

    I’d hate to think QLD would become an embarrassment again under an LNP government…that was hard for many to live with back in the time of Jo and the white shoe brigade…

    I went to live in Sydney in the early 80s for 6 mths…the jokes about QLD were sad.

    They had a lot to do with Jo, rednecks, being backwards, gerrymandering, police state etc.

    Some forget that we have gained a lot more respect since Jo left.

    Clive Palmer has just set us back yonks.

    N’

  55. “Abbott’s a puppet on a string…or leash”

    Chain I think. Today it looks more like a noose.

  56. Reportedly there are those that enjoy a noose. disturbing thought though, when you consider the parties involved.

  57. Things just became a little more interesting…

    A mining company has been accused of secretly funding a campaign against the ALP in the vital Brisbane electorate of Ashgrove.

    Liberal National Party (LNP) leader Campbell Newman must win the Brisbane seat to become premier, but polls show he faces a tough battle against sitting Labor MP Kate Jones.

    Thousands of letters have been sent to homes in the electorate from a group called ‘Straddie Mothers’ arguing against Labor’s plans to close down sand-mining operations on North Stradbroke Island, near Brisbane.

    The letters say the closures will hurt the island community and make it harder for locals to get jobs.

    Ms Jones says mining company Sibelco Australia has been bankrolling the campaign without lodging its interest with the Queensland Electoral Commission.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-03-21/claims-surface-of-secret-lnp-deals/3903010

  58. Is that the fourth one that has not got to the barrier.

    It appears to be all about the leader, who is not a leader, and no one else in the party.

    Will when push comes to shove, people vote for a party they know nothing about. They do not even know who the leader will be.

    I have a feeling that many may think twice about who they vote for when they pick up that pencil.

    Many do not think about elections until the last moment.

    I am not saying the Premier can win. It is time for change.

    It might turn out a little like the last election, when the voter face the same dilemma. The Opposition was found to be one step too far.

    I believe it will be closer than people are predicting.

  59. “Abbott’s a puppet on a string…or leash”

    Abbott is actually a puppet on a forearm. It means you know which direction he is being manipulated from.

  60. Oh and controlling him from the rear end means his brain doesn’t come into play and crap can be shoved out of his mouth.

  61. Palmer facing legal action over treason claims

    http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/palmer-facing-legal-action-over-treason-claims-20120321-1vj15.html

    —————-
    Why bother Drew?

    The public knows now that Palmer has recently left the building…and is floating in his own private space. Kinda sad really.

    But it does make you wonder if Clive Palmer is feeling defensive about his relationship with Chinese mining interests…and hoped to distract…point the finger elsewhere…

    Hasn’t worked.

    I wonder what Clive’s view on climate change is?

    http://www.stopcarbonlies.com/page/page/8171759.htm

    Is it similar to that other unpredictable and pushy type Barnaby Joyce?

    Defender of Gina Rinehart.

    Aren’t the latest bunch of conservatives fun?

    Fun place to visit but I wouldn’t want ’em running a country…or state.

    ——————–
    Another interesting article at The Brisbane Times:

    It all comes flooding back

    http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/it-all-comes-flooding-back-20120321-1vj79.html

    With disasters, after we congratulate ourselves for surviving, then praise the courage of some and our charity, we hunt for people we can blame. If human agency must be criticised, I wouldn’t focus on the engineers, that’s just too easy. It’s the poor (the sort who buy cheap land on floodplains), white-shoe brigaders who take advantage and build them houses, and city planners, politicians and urgers, who caused the Brisbane flood disasters. Now we are getting ready to allow them to do it again.

    ——————————
    Sadly the poor have few options…

    The planners and developers do.

    N’

  62. “Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen’s ”

    My memories are of a man that spent most of his life knocking things down.

    Whether is was his monster balls and chains clearing bushland and shrub to demolishing the Brisbane business centre, to running over protesters.

    He did do a good job of demolishing Mr. Howard’s run for government.

    He played a big role in the destruction of the Whitlam government. I acknowledge that Whitlam opened the door to allow his the Opportunity.

    Now he might have built something but for the love of me, I cannot recall what it was.

    Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen, reminds me of a present day Opposition leader.

    Great at demolishing. Not to sure what he aims to build.

  63. Does anyone know much of Palmer’s background.

    All I know is that he was born somewhere in Victoria,.. Has two children I believe and was widowed at the end of last century.

    I have no idea of his education or how he arrived at where he is,

  64. Nas, welcome back and good to see you.

    Your comments are a fearful reminder that no State or Territory should ever be exposed to that type of dictatorship again.

    But have we learnt?

  65. on March 21, 2012 at 12:52 pmMin
    Things just became a little more interesting…

    A mining company has been accused of secretly funding a campaign against the ALP in the vital Brisbane electorate of Ashgrove.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2012-03-21/claims-surface-of-secret-lnp-deals/3903010

    ———————-
    Sure has Min,
    Thnx for the link.

    And some naive voters think that Australia politics is pretty well free of the kind of disgraceful lobbying practices we’ve seen by American resource companies.

    Seems like we’d be better focusing on the lobbying practices of Aussie resource companies and shareholders rather than worrying about the CIA.

    Such distractions are too obvious for the average punter with nous.

    N’

  66. Cheers Migs.

    Great blog.

    Useful post. Thnx Alex. Well done. Top addition to this informative, truth- seeking blog.

    QLD deserves better than just a bunch of big time mining companies and property developers controlling our politicians.

    That’s why I voted for The Greens first…then Labor…on my postal vote.

    Gotta keep the bastards honest.

    I do dig Anna Bligh tho…her govt did a lot of good for my wife’s school…and motivated female science teachers and girls in that and other areas/subjects.

    Their confidence must not be undermined by a conservative boys’ club again.

    This is the 21st century. I hope the LNP remember that.

    N’

  67. Palmer backs away from CIA claims
    David Wroe
    March 21, 2012 – 1:13PM

    This morning the Greens tried unsuccessfully to debate Mr Palmer’s claims in the Senate. Senator Brown moved a motion calling on the Liberals and the Nationals to “condemn the defamatory comments, regarding the Greens, Mr Drew Hutton, Greenpeace and others, of their major supplicant Clive Palmer”.

    The move was blocked by Coalition and Labor senators.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/palmer-backs-away-from-cia-claims-20120321-1viok.html#ixzz1piPv18lj

    The Coalition look bankrupt once again.

    Tony Abbott should resign.

    The ALP senators should rethink this.

    N’

  68. Nas’, the only reason I can think of why the ALP senators did this is that Palmer had already had a retraction published and so there was not much to be gained.

  69. Hi Nas,

    We are lucky to have Alex do this post for us and I look forward to the live blog on Saturday.

    I’ve always enjoyed Alex’s writing. He calls a spade a spade.

  70. Min,
    Hope so.

    Migs,
    Live blog eh? Good stuff.

    And so it begins…the ridicule…QLD once again the butt of jokes:

    If you were to judge Queenslanders on the antics of Clive Palmer and Bob Katter, you would have to wonder whether there was something peculiar in the water up north.

    Mr Palmer, the mining billionaire, called a press conference yesterday to deliver his reaction to the federal government’s new mining tax but, puffed up with indignation about a near-impenetrable CIA plot, all but forgot to do so.

    Mr Katter and his hat, meanwhile, took to rap dancing.

    Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/political-news/off-their-rockefellers-in-badboy-queensland-20120320-1vi0e.html#ixzz1pibovBTM

    Groan.

    Won’t all this be great for trade, business and tourism?

    And the morale, confidence of our students.

    Great role models eh?

    Thnx for nothing you bankrupt extremist conservative dipsticks.

    N’

  71. This is why I love Queensland politics. It started out with something a little serious, moved onto rugby and which code of football is best (I’m truly amazed at how civil everyone kept that quick discussion), then onto more serious stuff before the usual election reminder of the evils of JBP.

    It seems that Clive Palmer’s latest comments are keeping with the best traditions of Queensland elections.

    I’m looking forward to doing the live blog on Saturday evening. It should be quite an interesting experience especially as I’ll be giving commentary (from Victoria) about the commentary, which will only be aired in Queensland.

    Oh and sorry about the late drinks service 😛

  72. Has anyone heard the latest predictions? I’m afraid I’m hampered with a slow mobile service.

  73. I heard in QT today that there is to be a rally in Canberra tomorrow, fronted by Clive Palmer. Something like the convoy of no cosequence, but instead of Trucks is it Private Jets?

    Should be a hoot. Will Abbott dare not show up, what about Barnaby?
    Imagine the banners, “CIA out”
    Will Anal fly in? He is a must for the oldies. Trouble is Anal has aligned himself with the Greens on Farms v CSG.

    According to Albanese it is about Clive personally not liking the carbon tax laws as passed by the Parliament.
    I also learned in QT that Clive has donated $4million to the Coalition.

  74. Clive was kicked out of the the Liberal Party many years ago for vote rigging. It’s one reason why he took such delight in effectively killing off that party and setting up the LNP.

    He has an ‘interesting’ background that now flies below the radar because the current crop of journalists only seem interested in ‘he said/she said’ type of ‘stories’.

    Gina tries to buy influence through purchasing a chunk of the MSM while Palmer simply bought himself a party.

  75. t…..the mess that they’re making in NSW and Vic will make the South Aussies ask themselves if wall to wall Liberal governments is such a good idea.

    I don’t need to be convinced, Min, but i don’t know about the rest of the state.

    I just hope we have our new, you beaut RAH built before the Liars manage to get their claws on the joint. It’s steaming ahead, so fingers crossed.

    “The greatest thing that could happen to the state and nation is when we get rid of all the media… then we could live in peace and tranquility and no one would know anything.

    (My bold)

    Bjelke-Petersen’s idea of paradise, Nas’. A police state and a muzzled, or absent, press. Fast forward to 2012, and Joh would have been more than satisfied.

    A compliant and complicit press concealing the truth about the opposition, state Liars Party governments and the minority Gillard government.

    Bjelke-Petersen claimed that Hollows’ team had been encouraging Aborigines to enrol to vote.

    Makes you wonder if it was Klan Kountry, doesn’t it, Nas’. We’ve come a long way since then, baby. Thank God! Although that element of racism is still alive and well in places.

    However, it explains how the Liars party has been so successful in demonising “boat people”.

    @11.07am, bloody hell!! Is Clive’s wife called Flo with a serious penchant for pumpkin scones, by any chance?

    Ms Jones says mining company Sibelco Australia has been bankrolling the campaign without lodging its interest with the Queensland Electoral Commission.

    Why do I not feel any surprise to read this, Min? F*cken miners! Double the MRRT, Swanny.

    ME @1.08pm, would the term “sock puppet” be a step too far?

  76. Clive made his first ‘real’ money in Gold Coast real estate. He was an original member of the ‘white shoe brigade’.

    All bluster and BS.

  77. Many years ago there was a reenactment in Brisbane of the arrival of the first settlers. Old Joh despised Aborigines so much that the actors who were employed to play the Indigenous people in the reenactment were not Aborigines, but white people painted black.

    Is it any wonder his death was welcomed by Indigenous Australians.

  78. And who could forget his call that all dingoes be exterminated after the Azaria mystery.

    And if that wasn’t ludicrous enough, how about his call that all crocodiles be exterminated after the American tourist, Ginger Meadows was taken by one.

  79. Makes you wonder if it was Klan Kountry, doesn’t it, Nas’. We’ve come a long way since then, baby. Thank God!

    Ain’t that the truth jane…it’s alot more civilised here now…tho, there was plenty of fun to be had in this old backwater back in the early 70s before I went to Canada…playin’ in the dirt with my soldiers…navigating our way across the creek with Mum to buy a steak sandwich or burger with beetroot and pineapple over at the petrol station…sitting outside the drive-in and watching the film from a distance, the many car speakers echoing eerily thru the night…watching films at the cinema in deck chairs sucking and chewing on Jaffas and Maltesers…going to the local store after school on hot days to buy Split and other treats…soft drinks crates being delivered to the door…

    Good times for a kid who didn’t worry much about politics then.

    Jane said:
    Although that element of racism is still alive and well in places.

    Unfortunately. Last time I came across it was in a country town. Stupid young fella who was as antagonistic towards women as he was “Abos” (one of many insulting descriptions he used). He was an ignorant conspiracy theorist who listened to shock jocks.

    You’ll find such a venomous snake under a number of rocks out bush. Alot less of them in the cities now…tho if you get the odd fella drunk the fangs come out.

    Another reason I don’t drink in hotels anymore…got tired of the BS and spray from silly drunken farts.

    In fact, I haven’t drank since New Years…and probably have had less in the past two years than I had in a fortnight before my week in hospital. Can’t say it’s helped the depressive bouts…they still descend regularly…but I do feel generally calmer…less argumentative…easier to ignore dopey comments by the bitter and envious.

    And some days the light and colours seem brighter. Like it’s not just a one-way trip in the lift. 🙂

    Might be a better way to deal with a possible change of government…rather than storming and stressing. We’ll see.

    Still, I’m no evangelical wowser…each to their own…if it gets ya thru the night…

    Provided ya don’t spend much of yer time raging and feuding at/with others…a waste of everyone’s time…some people just have to learn to mature and move on…perhaps a wee bit less booze would help.

    Cheers,
    N’

  80. Lateline – transcript

    Anna Bligh defends record as Premier

    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2012/s3460811.htm

    Queensland Premier Anna Bligh is facing almost certain defeat in this weekend’s election, but is not going down without a fight.

    ANNA BLIGH: We are, however, creating jobs. In the last 12 months we created 16,000 jobs and between them, NSW and Victoria lost 44,000 jobs. So, this hasn’t been easy times, but we’ve created almost 90,000 new jobs and hung on to the ones that we had and that has meant that we would have seen, without a doubt, if you put that GFC with the disasters that we had where businesses did actually lose money and in some cases fold, we would have seen unemployment in double digits if we hadn’t taken those tough decisions.

    And I’ll never regret making sure, doing everything that we could, to keep people off the unemployment line.

  81. Campbell Newman has pulled ahead of the ALP’s Kate…

    I feel bad for Kate…she’s beaut and has fought so well..

    But the idea of someone else, particularly a Nat taking over the leadership if the LNP wins, gives me the chills…as I’ve mentioned before.

    7.19am: Campbell Newman looks to be almost guaranteed to win the seat of Ashgrove, according to the latest poll results.

    ReachTEL conducted a phone poll last night in the electorate of 931 people – about 10% of the total voters in the seat – and with just two days to go until the election, Mr Newman is ahead of Labor’s incumbent Kate Jones by 49% to 40.8% of the primary vote.

    The results show Mr Newman’s primary vote has increased for the first time since December, while Ms Jones’ vote had dropped.

    On a two-party preferred basis (based on 2009 distributions), Mr Newman is on 54.2% of the vote, with Ms Jones trailing on 45.8%.

    ReachTEL also asked voters whether they would prefer an LNP government with Campbell Newman as its leader, or without.

    57.2% said they would prefer it with him, while 42.8% said they would prefer someone else.

    Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/…/…0120322-1vkxm.html

    N’

  82. Nas’, while there’s life there’s hope. I note that the poll is a phone poll, and Ashgrove contains a large number of uni students. In all the years that youngest has lived there I’ve never known any of her friends to have other than a mobile phone.

  83. Min,
    Good point.

    I’m being pragmatic on this occasion, hoping Newman wins his seat (just hate the fact it’s Kate’s)…I can’t see the ALP winning…and I sure don’t want Springborg with his Borg attitude and connections to Palmer in charge…

    tho I do reckon the ALP might’ve saved a few seats thnx to Anna’s blitz…

    and a few tasty policies…

    and the realisation by some voters that they could end up with a National party-led government with Clive Palmer acting like undemocratic Jo on the sidelines…

    and many people still have fond memories of Anna talking us thru our flood-related panic like a true leader showing courage under fire.

    My father-in-law from Beaudesert said at the BBQ on Sunday he was in two minds…he likes Anna Bligh…and reckons people have short memories…she shoula got more credit. He reckons she’ll be missed soon enuff.

    N’

  84. the lazy msm, a poll says newman will win, so the reporting now turns to that ‘s it, he has won.

    it would be amusing to see the msm if it is closer than the polls and whoever wins has to wait a few days past saturday evening.

  85. Was disturbed to hear a renowned Courier Mail journo mock  fellow QLDers by joking on SKY NEWS yesterday that most up here wouldn’t even know what “unfettered power” meant.

    Do the Murdoch people think QLDers are dumb?

    Is this a perception across the Murdoch empire.

    ————————
    Disturbed to hear from the QLD Treasurer that teachers and nurses will only receive 1percent increase in wages per year under the LNP due to the public service cap policy.

    So much for the Libs understanding the needs related to cost of living.

    ————————–

    Not good:

    ANOTHER Gold Coast-based LNP representative is embroiled in controversy, this time over plans to erect a mobile phone tower on his property, which will earn him hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Residents are furious at Coomera MP Michael Crandon’s move to lease part of his semi-rural Kingsholme property to Telstra to build the tower, only metres from one neighbour.

    Frustrated they can’t punish him at the ballot box because Kingsholme is in the neighbouring electorate of Albert, residents are instead seeking to whip up public controversy as Mr Crandon campaigns to hold his marginal seat.

    The 25m tower was approved by the Gold Coast City Council without community consultation before Mr Crandon was elected to Parliament in 2009. It is set to go up within weeks.

    Mr Crandon, a former financial planner who earns almost $140,000 a year as an MP, plus allowances, stands to make more than $600,000 from the phone tower on land Telstra will lease from him starting at $18,500 a year and rising 5 per cent annually.

    (Courier Mail)

    N’

  86. Carriers do not need to seek council approval before installing a phone tower that is deemed to be ‘low visual impact’, and complies with basic setback rules.

    http://sylviahale.org.au/campaigns/mobile-phone-towers-and-you-1

    LOCAL government has been fighting its lack of power over the installation of mobile phone towers for years, reflecting community fears over the health effects of electromagnetic radiation. Now it is supporting two private member’s bills in Federal Parliament seeking to remove the exemption for low-impact towers from planning and environmental laws.

    http://m.smh.com.au/nsw/drive-to-dial-back-phone-tower-power-20120319-1vfis.html

    A Bill designed to force telecommunications companies to consult more widely with communities about the erection of mobile phone towers has been rejected by a federal parliamentary committee.

    http://www.zdnet.com.au/mobile-tower-bill-rejected-339334327.htm

  87. What is going on proves my belief that polling should be suspended during the run up to an election.

    What role does polling play? That is the question.

    I believe it is unnecessary. We prohibited TV advertising, I think three days before.

  88. The point appears to be “low visual impact” and of course the residents’ idea of what this entails is the complete opposite to that of the instrumentality.

    This is just Victoria and a few years ago, but we (Lilydale Shire) did lodge an objection. We didn’t stop the tower but did manage to have it relocated.

  89. Nas’ @1.46pm, yes I remember when I was a relatively carefree kid, climbing down the well with my mother’s best milking bucket to catch frogs.Giving pet chooks swings, listening to Uncle Binns on the ABC, the Goon Show Sunday nights and later sitting up the back of the pictures on Saturday night and lobbing jaffas down the front on the adults. Pashing Jimmy Ryan.

    Those were the days.

  90. Jane,
    Sounds great. Giving pet chooks a swing sounds like a larf.
    Nothing like free range eggs from home eh?

    Remember the smell of the septic tanks?
    And windows without screens…giant mossies buzzing thru the humid nights.
    As a kid it didn’t bother me at all.

    We found a stray Burmese…fed him up for a few weeks and took him to a cat show…he peed all over us and the cage and my Mum’s boyfriend’s car…was stinky hilarious…cleaned him up just in the nick of time…put a nice bow on him…he won first prize. 🙂
    We called him Panther. Cheered my Mum up no end as she’d had a breakdown after leaving Adelaide (1970) fleeing violent stepdad…was great to see a smile on her face.

    Loved going to the book shop in Brissie…long trip from Eight Mile Plains in those days…bought Dr.Who, Bunter and Jennings series, Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators.

    Watched lots of Skippy and Thunderbirds and Flipper…plenty of old sci-fi movies, Abbott and Costello, Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin, Carry On films…and pommy TV comedies.

    Played Scrabble, Monopoly, Risk and Game of Life…and had Mr. Potato Head and a Dalek.

    I loved chewing on Milky Bars…had the cowboy hat and guns. 🙂 And enjoyed playing marbles at school…and throwing around those rubber band driven planes.

    Used to enjoy doing the road crossing job outside our school…we’d stop less than 5-10 cars if we were lucky…heaps of kids took turns.

    Also enjoyed playing tennis during school lunch with my Slazenger racket.

    Got my first crush…a girl who’d come from Yugoslavia…she hated me. It was two months of misery. And bad bass drum work during anthem on assembly. Felt like Charlie Brown.

    Peed in a phone booth on the way home from school one day because I’d drank too much pop drink in the heat. Never repeated. Was so embarrassed when an old lady called out. Ran off down street…dignity trailing behind me. I was nine.

    Good old days in Sth East QLD.

    N’

  91. How about hawkie

    “Bob Hawke’s telling of it, his voice dripping with disdain, elevated the matter to high scandal.

    ”At the end of the debate, our lovely candidate, Kate Jones, offered to shake hands,” said Hawke, resting his fond gaze on the lovely candidate, his voice fairly quivering.

    ”And Campbell Newman refused to shake hands with her!

    ”What? I mean…

    ”This is just not, to me, Australian!

    ”How can an Aussie bloke at the end of a debate refuse to go and shake the hand of the young woman who he’s just debated?

    ”That says something about the sort of person.

    Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/opinion/political-news/silver-bodgie-gallops-to-the-aid-of-a-qld-damsel-in-distress-20120322-1vm7t.html#ixzz1pq2eOLQv

  92. Qld nurse look to Vic, it only took 9 months to win a wage rise and retain nurse ratios.
    Vic govt offered 2.5%
    Nurses got over 4 years between 14- 21%
    so the minimum is 3.5%

    Police were given 19% over 4 years but they didn’t have to go through the rigmarole of negotiation.

    “Wages negotiations with nurses and teachers are due to occur in coming months.
    Mr Nicholls was repeatedly asked at today’s media conference whether he could guarantee public servants would receive pay rises at least equal to inflation, but he refused to do so.
    Instead, Mr Nicholls said an LNP government would enter into wages negotiations in good faith and with an open mind.”

    Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/lnp-unveils-longawaited-costings-20120322-1vm3a.html#ixzz1pq3JaxW8

  93. The handshake.

    The question, of course, was about Campbell Newman’s qualities as man and as an Australian. And in Bob
    Hawke’s estimation, he failed dismally on both counts.
    ”I believe last Sunday there was a debate,” Labor’s longest serving Prime Minister began. Everyone instantly knew what he was talking about.
    Newman and Ms Jones had gone head to head, and at the end of it, Newman had behaved like a cad.

    Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/opinion/political-news/silver-bodgie-gallops-to-the-aid-of-a-qld-damsel-in-distress-20120322-1vm7t.html#ixzz1pqBVV3XK

  94. I keep coming back, Alex, hoping to get cheered up! I realize that ‘It’s time’ is a big factor in Queensland, but when I look at the NLP advertising about Labor lies and worse I just feel sick.

    I am feeling very sad for Anna Bligh who strikes me as a very sincere woman who is putting her best foot forward right to the end. I think she’ll be proved right about Campbell Newman’s crookedness. She doesn’t strike me as the type to make things up just as vote a catcher. I was so impressed by her and Kate today.

  95. “She doesn’t strike me as the type to make things up just as vote a catcher. I was so impressed by her and Kate today.”

    In full agreement. As the Opposition says, where there is smoke, there is fire.

    There are still too many unanswered questions.

  96. Queensland is in line for local hospital boards.

    Once again, back to the past.

    Watching interview ABC24 Newman sure has a sad face. He does not look comfortable. Could this be because he is being asked some solid questions.

    It appears the state is in for reviews.

    Reminds one of NSW where 12 months later, is still having reviews, and very little action.

    All he seems to be doing is promising reviews.

  97. Be aware. I believe that that the NSW and now the Queensland Labor is being condemn for selling off assets.

    Yet the anger of the people, see Labor replaced with Coalition governments, who immediately set out to sell what is left.

    BILLIONS of dollars in public assets could be sold under a plan being developed by the state government to raise cash for future infrastructure without taking Victoria further into debt.
    With state finances under growing pressure, Premier Ted Baillieu yesterday said the government was ”not shy” about selling assets to fund his infrastructure agenda, which includes a controversial tunnel from the Tullamarine Freeway to the Eastern Freeway.
    ”The sale of assets to realise funds to invest in future infrastructure is both legitimate and often necessary,” he said.

    Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/baillieu-flags-state-asset-sales-20120322-1vmzf.html#ixzz1ptXtIyqw

  98. Just back from a blood test…chatted to a few people at the doc’s office…still plenty of undecided…a couple of “a pox on both their houses”. Still respect for Anna Bligh. I’m not sure the LNP have got bragging rights yet…

    If the ALP after nigh on 20 years of government (subtract the Borbidge era) can hold onto more than 16 seats I reckon Tony Abbott could be blamed for being so arrogant as to trying to manipulate QLD voters using the carbon price as a propaganda tool…

    QLDers know Hawke…many respect him as a former leader..”.good old Hawkey”…

    Same goes for Howard.

    And Swan and Rudd are local boys.

    The PM is the PM.

    Abbott is a wannabe…intruding in QLD politics…overreaching.  This could come back to bite Mr. Attack Dog. We’ll see.

    Anna’s still lookin’ good…top class without the airs…no wonder QLDers voted for her last time.

    As for the election coverage…the QLD ABC news was bloody disgraceful last night…my wife was incensed, she reckons we should’ve counted the number of times they talked down Anna and the ALP’s chances.

    SKY NEWS and the newspapers have been no better.

    This poster has a long memory.

    N’

  99. Nas’ and “Abbott is a wannabe…intruding in QLD politics…”. In my experience, most definitely something Queenslanders do not appreciate..southerners telling them how they should think.

  100. most definitely something Queenslanders do not appreciate..southerners telling them how they should think.
    ———–

    Min,
    Is it just me or does Abbott seem anxious these days…he came across slightly agitated on SKY today…

    I noticed when asked about the “target on forehead” meltdown he avoided any apology or real answer like the plague.

    Gutless, caged Tony.

    N’

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